<!--{{{-->
<link rel='alternate' type='application/rss+xml' title='RSS' href='index.xml' />
<!--}}}-->
Background: #fff
Foreground: #000
PrimaryPale: #8cf
PrimaryLight: #18f
PrimaryMid: #04b
PrimaryDark: #014
SecondaryPale: #ffc
SecondaryLight: #fe8
SecondaryMid: #db4
SecondaryDark: #841
TertiaryPale: #eee
TertiaryLight: #ccc
TertiaryMid: #999
TertiaryDark: #666
Error: #f88
/*{{{*/
body {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

a {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
a:hover {background-color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
a img {border:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]]; background:transparent;}
h1 {border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
h2,h3 {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border-color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.button:active {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}

.header {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.headerShadow {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.headerShadow a {font-weight:normal; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.headerForeground {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.headerForeground a {font-weight:normal; color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}

.tabSelected{color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];
	background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];
	border-left:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
	border-top:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
	border-right:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];
}
.tabUnselected {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tabContents {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.tabContents .button {border:0;}

#sidebar {}
#sidebarOptions input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {border:none;color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a:active {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}

.wizard {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.wizard h1 {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border:none;}
.wizard h2 {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:none;}
.wizardStep {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];
	border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.wizardStep.wizardStepDone {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.wizardFooter {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]];}
.wizardFooter .status {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.wizard .button {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; border: 1px solid;
	border-color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.wizard .button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.wizard .button:active {color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: 1px solid;
	border-color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}

.wizard .notChanged {background:transparent;}
.wizard .changedLocally {background:#80ff80;}
.wizard .changedServer {background:#8080ff;}
.wizard .changedBoth {background:#ff8080;}
.wizard .notFound {background:#ffff80;}
.wizard .putToServer {background:#ff80ff;}
.wizard .gotFromServer {background:#80ffff;}

#messageArea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#messageArea .button {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; border:none;}

.popupTiddler {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.popup {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-left:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-top:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border-right:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; border-bottom:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.popup hr {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]]; border-bottom:1px;}
.popup li.disabled {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.popup li a, .popup li a:visited {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popup li a:active {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border: none;}
.popupHighlight {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
.listBreak div {border-bottom:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.tiddler .defaultCommand {font-weight:bold;}

.shadow .title {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.title {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.subtitle {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.toolbar {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .toolbar a {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.selected .toolbar a:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}

.tagging, .tagged {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]]; background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];}
.selected .tagging, .selected .tagged {background-color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.tagging .listTitle, .tagged .listTitle {color:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}
.tagging .button, .tagged .button {border:none;}

.footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}
.selected .footer {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.sparkline {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryPale]]; border:0;}
.sparktick {background:[[ColorPalette::PrimaryDark]];}

.error, .errorButton {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::Error]];}
.warning {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.lowlight {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryLight]];}

.zoomer {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]]; border:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}

.imageLink, #displayArea .imageLink {background:transparent;}

.annotation {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}

.viewer .listTitle {list-style-type:none; margin-left:-2em;}
.viewer .button {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]];}
.viewer blockquote {border-left:3px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border:2px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.viewer th, .viewer thead td, .twtable th, .twtable thead td {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryMid]]; border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.viewer td, .viewer tr, .twtable td, .twtable tr {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.viewer pre {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryPale]];}
.viewer code {color:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryDark]];}
.viewer hr {border:0; border-top:dashed 1px [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}

.highlight, .marked {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]];}

.editor input {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]];}
.editor textarea {border:1px solid [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]; width:100%;}
.editorFooter {color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
.readOnly {background:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryPale]];}

#backstageArea {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::TertiaryMid]];}
#backstageArea a {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageArea a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::SecondaryLight]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; }
#backstageArea a.backstageSelTab {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageButton a {background:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstageButton a:hover {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border:none;}
#backstagePanel {background:[[ColorPalette::Background]]; border-color: [[ColorPalette::Background]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]] [[ColorPalette::TertiaryDark]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button {border:none; color:[[ColorPalette::Background]];}
.backstagePanelFooter .button:hover {color:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]];}
#backstageCloak {background:[[ColorPalette::Foreground]]; opacity:0.6; filter:'alpha(opacity=60)';}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
* html .tiddler {height:1%;}

body {font-size:.75em; font-family:arial,helvetica; margin:0; padding:0;}

h1,h2,h3,h4,h5,h6 {font-weight:bold; text-decoration:none;}
h1,h2,h3 {padding-bottom:1px; margin-top:1.2em;margin-bottom:0.3em;}
h4,h5,h6 {margin-top:1em;}
h1 {font-size:1.35em;}
h2 {font-size:1.25em;}
h3 {font-size:1.1em;}
h4 {font-size:1em;}
h5 {font-size:.9em;}

hr {height:1px;}

a {text-decoration:none;}

dt {font-weight:bold;}

ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}
ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-alpha;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:lower-roman;}
ol ol ol ol ol ol ol {list-style-type:decimal;}

.txtOptionInput {width:11em;}

#contentWrapper .chkOptionInput {border:0;}

.externalLink {text-decoration:underline;}

.indent {margin-left:3em;}
.outdent {margin-left:3em; text-indent:-3em;}
code.escaped {white-space:nowrap;}

.tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold;}
.tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-style:italic;}

/* the 'a' is required for IE, otherwise it renders the whole tiddler in bold */
a.tiddlyLinkNonExisting.shadow {font-weight:bold;}

#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkExisting,
	#mainMenu .tiddlyLinkNonExisting,
	#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkNonExisting {font-weight:normal; font-style:normal;}
#sidebarTabs .tiddlyLinkExisting {font-weight:bold; font-style:normal;}

.header {position:relative;}
.header a:hover {background:transparent;}
.headerShadow {position:relative; padding:4.5em 0 1em 1em; left:-1px; top:-1px;}
.headerForeground {position:absolute; padding:4.5em 0 1em 1em; left:0px; top:0px;}

.siteTitle {font-size:3em;}
.siteSubtitle {font-size:1.2em;}

#mainMenu {position:absolute; left:0; width:10em; text-align:right; line-height:1.6em; padding:1.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0.5em; font-size:1.1em;}

#sidebar {position:absolute; right:3px; width:16em; font-size:.9em;}
#sidebarOptions {padding-top:0.3em;}
#sidebarOptions a {margin:0 0.2em; padding:0.2em 0.3em; display:block;}
#sidebarOptions input {margin:0.4em 0.5em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {margin-left:1em; padding:0.5em; font-size:.85em;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel a {font-weight:bold; display:inline; padding:0;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel input {margin:0 0 0.3em 0;}
#sidebarTabs .tabContents {width:15em; overflow:hidden;}

.wizard {padding:0.1em 1em 0 2em;}
.wizard h1 {font-size:2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0; margin:0.4em 0 0.2em;}
.wizard h2 {font-size:1.2em; font-weight:bold; background:none; padding:0; margin:0.4em 0 0.2em;}
.wizardStep {padding:1em 1em 1em 1em;}
.wizard .button {margin:0.5em 0 0; font-size:1.2em;}
.wizardFooter {padding:0.8em 0.4em 0.8em 0;}
.wizardFooter .status {padding:0 0.4em; margin-left:1em;}
.wizard .button {padding:0.1em 0.2em;}

#messageArea {position:fixed; top:2em; right:0; margin:0.5em; padding:0.5em; z-index:2000; _position:absolute;}
.messageToolbar {display:block; text-align:right; padding:0.2em;}
#messageArea a {text-decoration:underline;}

.tiddlerPopupButton {padding:0.2em;}
.popupTiddler {position: absolute; z-index:300; padding:1em; margin:0;}

.popup {position:absolute; z-index:300; font-size:.9em; padding:0; list-style:none; margin:0;}
.popup .popupMessage {padding:0.4em;}
.popup hr {display:block; height:1px; width:auto; padding:0; margin:0.2em 0;}
.popup li.disabled {padding:0.4em;}
.popup li a {display:block; padding:0.4em; font-weight:normal; cursor:pointer;}
.listBreak {font-size:1px; line-height:1px;}
.listBreak div {margin:2px 0;}

.tabset {padding:1em 0 0 0.5em;}
.tab {margin:0 0 0 0.25em; padding:2px;}
.tabContents {padding:0.5em;}
.tabContents ul, .tabContents ol {margin:0; padding:0;}
.txtMainTab .tabContents li {list-style:none;}
.tabContents li.listLink { margin-left:.75em;}

#contentWrapper {display:block;}
#splashScreen {display:none;}

#displayArea {margin:1em 17em 0 14em;}

.toolbar {text-align:right; font-size:.9em;}

.tiddler {padding:1em 1em 0;}

.missing .viewer,.missing .title {font-style:italic;}

.title {font-size:1.6em; font-weight:bold;}

.missing .subtitle {display:none;}
.subtitle {font-size:1.1em;}

.tiddler .button {padding:0.2em 0.4em;}

.tagging {margin:0.5em 0.5em 0.5em 0; float:left; display:none;}
.isTag .tagging {display:block;}
.tagged {margin:0.5em; float:right;}
.tagging, .tagged {font-size:0.9em; padding:0.25em;}
.tagging ul, .tagged ul {list-style:none; margin:0.25em; padding:0;}
.tagClear {clear:both;}

.footer {font-size:.9em;}
.footer li {display:inline;}

.annotation {padding:0.5em; margin:0.5em;}

* html .viewer pre {width:99%; padding:0 0 1em 0;}
.viewer {line-height:1.4em; padding-top:0.5em;}
.viewer .button {margin:0 0.25em; padding:0 0.25em;}
.viewer blockquote {line-height:1.5em; padding-left:0.8em;margin-left:2.5em;}
.viewer ul, .viewer ol {margin-left:0.5em; padding-left:1.5em;}

.viewer table, table.twtable {border-collapse:collapse; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
.viewer th, .viewer td, .viewer tr,.viewer caption,.twtable th, .twtable td, .twtable tr,.twtable caption {padding:3px;}
table.listView {font-size:0.85em; margin:0.8em 1.0em;}
table.listView th, table.listView td, table.listView tr {padding:0px 3px 0px 3px;}

.viewer pre {padding:0.5em; margin-left:0.5em; font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em; overflow:auto;}
.viewer code {font-size:1.2em; line-height:1.4em;}

.editor {font-size:1.1em;}
.editor input, .editor textarea {display:block; width:100%; font:inherit;}
.editorFooter {padding:0.25em 0; font-size:.9em;}
.editorFooter .button {padding-top:0px; padding-bottom:0px;}

.fieldsetFix {border:0; padding:0; margin:1px 0px;}

.sparkline {line-height:1em;}
.sparktick {outline:0;}

.zoomer {font-size:1.1em; position:absolute; overflow:hidden;}
.zoomer div {padding:1em;}

* html #backstage {width:99%;}
* html #backstageArea {width:99%;}
#backstageArea {display:none; position:relative; overflow: hidden; z-index:150; padding:0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageToolbar {position:relative;}
#backstageArea a {font-weight:bold; margin-left:0.5em; padding:0.3em 0.5em;}
#backstageButton {display:none; position:absolute; z-index:175; top:0; right:0;}
#backstageButton a {padding:0.1em 0.4em; margin:0.1em;}
#backstage {position:relative; width:100%; z-index:50;}
#backstagePanel {display:none; z-index:100; position:absolute; width:90%; margin-left:3em; padding:1em;}
.backstagePanelFooter {padding-top:0.2em; float:right;}
.backstagePanelFooter a {padding:0.2em 0.4em;}
#backstageCloak {display:none; z-index:20; position:absolute; width:100%; height:100px;}

.whenBackstage {display:none;}
.backstageVisible .whenBackstage {display:block;}
/*}}}*/
/***
StyleSheet for use when a translation requires any css style changes.
This StyleSheet can be used directly by languages such as Chinese, Japanese and Korean which need larger font sizes.
***/
/*{{{*/
body {font-size:0.8em;}
#sidebarOptions {font-size:1.05em;}
#sidebarOptions a {font-style:normal;}
#sidebarOptions .sliderPanel {font-size:0.95em;}
.subtitle {font-size:0.8em;}
.viewer table.listView {font-size:0.95em;}
/*}}}*/
/*{{{*/
@media print {
#mainMenu, #sidebar, #messageArea, .toolbar, #backstageButton, #backstageArea {display: none !important;}
#displayArea {margin: 1em 1em 0em;}
noscript {display:none;} /* Fixes a feature in Firefox 1.5.0.2 where print preview displays the noscript content */
}
/*}}}*/
<!--{{{-->
<div class='header' macro='gradient vert [[ColorPalette::PrimaryLight]] [[ColorPalette::PrimaryMid]]'>
<div class='headerShadow'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
<div class='headerForeground'>
<span class='siteTitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteTitle'></span>&nbsp;
<span class='siteSubtitle' refresh='content' tiddler='SiteSubtitle'></span>
</div>
</div>
<div id='mainMenu' refresh='content' tiddler='MainMenu'></div>
<div id='sidebar'>
<div id='sidebarOptions' refresh='content' tiddler='SideBarOptions'></div>
<div id='sidebarTabs' refresh='content' force='true' tiddler='SideBarTabs'></div>
</div>
<div id='displayArea'>
<div id='messageArea'></div>
<div id='tiddlerDisplay'></div>
</div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar [[ToolbarCommands::ViewToolbar]]'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='subtitle'><span macro='view modifier link'></span>, <span macro='view modified date'></span> (<span macro='message views.wikified.createdPrompt'></span> <span macro='view created date'></span>)</div>
<div class='tagging' macro='tagging'></div>
<div class='tagged' macro='tags'></div>
<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>
<div class='tagClear'></div>
<!--}}}-->
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar [[ToolbarCommands::EditToolbar]]'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit title'></div>
<div macro='annotations'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit text'></div>
<div class='editor' macro='edit tags'></div><div class='editorFooter'><span macro='message views.editor.tagPrompt'></span><span macro='tagChooser excludeLists'></span></div>
<!--}}}-->
To get started with this blank [[TiddlyWiki]], you'll need to modify the following tiddlers:
* [[SiteTitle]] & [[SiteSubtitle]]: The title and subtitle of the site, as shown above (after saving, they will also appear in the browser title bar)
* [[MainMenu]]: The menu (usually on the left)
* [[DefaultTiddlers]]: Contains the names of the tiddlers that you want to appear when the TiddlyWiki is opened
You'll also need to enter your username for signing your edits: <<option txtUserName>>
These [[InterfaceOptions]] for customising [[TiddlyWiki]] are saved in your browser

Your username for signing your edits. Write it as a [[WikiWord]] (eg [[JoeBloggs]])

<<option txtUserName>>
<<option chkSaveBackups>> [[SaveBackups]]
<<option chkAutoSave>> [[AutoSave]]
<<option chkRegExpSearch>> [[RegExpSearch]]
<<option chkCaseSensitiveSearch>> [[CaseSensitiveSearch]]
<<option chkAnimate>> [[EnableAnimations]]

----
Also see [[AdvancedOptions]]
<<importTiddlers>>
Today was an important day in my growing appreciation of tiddlers.
At the same time Australian is creating a new national curriculum so to are the United States creating a [['Draft k-12 Common Core State Standards Available for Comment|http://www.nga.org/portal/site/nga/menuitem.6c9a8a9ebc6ae07eee28aca9501010a0/?vgnextoid=e50b863754047210VgnVCM1000005e00100aRCRD&vgnextchannel=759b8f2005361010VgnVCM1000001a01010aRCRD]]
!WASHINGTON
>The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) today released the first official public draft of the K-12 standards as part of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, a process being led by governors and chief state school officers in 51 states, territories, and the District of Columbia. These draft standards, developed together with teachers, school administrators and experts, seek to provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare our children for college and the workforce.

I will be referring to the core standards (USA) in the intro tiddler - http://www.corestandards.org/ 
* After a weekend (May 15 - 18, 2010) visit at the home of [[Marc Seifer|http://www.marcseifer.com]] Professor of psychology at [[Roger Williams University|http://www.rwu.edu]], Rhode Island, USA and avid writer (//From Freud to Gurdjieff// and the acclaimed //[[Wizard: The Life & Times of Nicola Tesla|http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/0806519606/wwwnetsensenet06]]//, (his newer work, 2009) //[[Transcending the speed of Light: Consciousness, Quantum Physics, and the Fifth Dimension|http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1594772290/wwwnetsensenet06]]//, His well known //[[The Definitive Book of Handwriting Analysis: The Complete Guide to Interpreting Personalities, Detecting Forgeries, and Revealing Brain Activity Through the Science of Graphology|http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/ASIN/1601630255/wwwnetsensenet06]]//, several novels and his current work on a book about my brother, during conversations about metaphysics and [[hyperlink]]s and the ways of the World Wide Web and its effects on consciousness, I have so many thoughts and ways of seeing [[hyperlink]] that I will be doing a new research project on the effects on consciousness and [[hyperlink]]s after this unit of study .
* [[transnational identities]]
* [[multifocal]]
Electronic communication has been important to globalisation and the rise of modern society, not simply for its capacity to “transmit” neutral information globally and in real time, but as a stage for the enactment of modernity itself, with all of its contending views and forces. The evolution of the media has had important consequences for the form that modern societies have acquired and it has been interwoven in crucial ways with the major institutional transformations which have shaped modernity. John B. Thompson argues that:  

The development of communication media was interwoven in complex ways with a number of other developmental processes which, taken together, were constitutive of what we have come to call “modernity”. Hence, if we wish to understand the nature of modernity - that is, of the institutional characteristics of modern societies and the life conditions created by them - then we must give a central role to the development of communication media and their impact (Thompson, 1995, p. 3). 
[[Neuage]] 2005 [[PhD]]
How is it then that we process such textual cues as we do with our iPhones, iPads, MSing and what it is that will come next? Is this learned from the practices of intertextual linking, established within our reading background and acquired alongside literacy – or is it a part of our dialogic skills developed in talk: a central feature of “natural conversation”, rehearsed in everyday chat, and transferred across into text-based online behaviours? How much more can our text-based “reading” traditions tell us of the texting act?
Question 3 is helping me formulate my presentation for tomorrow for the position of Directory of Technology at a major NYC K - 12 school. Jobs are almost impossible in NYC in education. Last week there was a listing for seven teaching job at a NYC school and there were more than 3500 applications received. For the job I am going for there are boxes - I have been told - of applications. I am one of the lucky ones - I get to spend a day being interviewed throughout the school. With a [[PhD]] in Information Technology, years as the Director of Technology at two large upstate schools and a computer teacher K - 12 and at university for a decade I hope I have an edge.
Australian curriculum portal. All things relating to the new national curriculum. 
http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au
assicons from Neuage PhD on [[emoticons]]
A funny take on smileys and emoticons, assicons involve another body part. Here are some examples:

(_!_) a regular ass 
(__!__) a fat ass 
(!) a tight ass 
(_._) a flat ass 
(_*_) a sore ass loser 
(_o_) an ass that's been around 
(_O_) an ass that's been around even more 
(_o^^o_) a wise ass 
(_E=mc2_) a smart ass 
(_13_) an unlucky ass 
(_$_) money coming out of his ass 
(_?_) a dumb ass 
(_x_) kiss my ass 
Activity 2.1 

I can only speak from State-side. The changes going on now in the classroom is part economics driven and part the stake holders: community, parents faculty. I was the Directory of Technology for two private single-sex schools, in upstate New York 2004 – 2006 as well as the computer chair and high school computer teacher at these two schools. They were across the street from one another and were the male and female part of the same school. We had computer classes beginning in grade 4. The girls in grade 6 - 12 at the girl's school were all provided with a Mac at the beginning of the school year. This had been going on since the end of the 1990s with the theory that girls were not exposed to computers as much as boys so they should have them all the time.  What I saw from the beginning was that the boys lagged behind the girls in computer knowledge by the time they were in high schoool. They could play games but little else. In my classes in 10 -12 I taught 3D animation, webpage development, Flash, and the Microsoft Office Suite. The boys really struggled and were a bit of a bother just because they were embarrassed  that they could not do as well as the females. We had co-educational classes in the high school, and students would cross the street to share classes such as computing. The boy's side  used PCs – somehow the thinking was that Macs were for girls and PCs for boys. This is true, I was quite surprised at this rational. 

In 2005 – 7, I worked at a private school in Manhattan, grades 6 - 10. Again I was the computer teacher though I began more integration with other subjects. We integrated projects with English, Social Studies, Art, and Science.  We did a lot of collaborative learning in grades 6 – 8, using Google Documents and Facebook and MIT's Scratch.  In 7th and 8th grade we made mashups with poetry, video and music and posted them to youtube. One of our sites, I kept there - http://www.youtube.com/thedwightschool 

In 2008 the computer technology across New York City changed. It seems that all at once computer teachers were replaced by techies. I lost my job because I did not want to just work in the server room running the network and assisting teachers with their Smart-boards, fixing computers etc. In one short span there were 18 jobs for technology integrators and no jobs for computer teachers in private schools in NYC. I have not found out why this change came about so rapidly. My initial problem with this is that there needs to be specific computer classes. The idea was that teachers should know enough to integrate technology in their classroom. My last job was in a public school in NYC. As I do not have a teaching certificate, hence why I am doing this course, I am not suppose to teach in a public school. I was hired as the computer integrator. What I discovered was that teachers did not know a lot about computing apart from Office, and some had had a go at Photoshop and that was about it.  The upshot was that I spent the year teaching classes because teachers did not know enough to integrate technology. We were using Comic Life in Second and third grade, iMovie and 2d and 3rd grade as well as beginning story writing with several software in kindy and first grade. These were primarily teachers in their early 20s who just threw their hands in the air basically when it came to projects and I was alone teaching computer classes to K – 3 and 6 – 8. I am 62 and have been doing this for decades. My PhD thesis title at UniSA was 'Conversational Analysis of Chatroom “Talk”'. I taught Information Technologies at the Magill Campus there in the back blocks of Adelaide in the 1990s. Bottom line, age has nothing to do with all this. Schools which embrace technology will have no 'powering down' phenomenons because they are always switched on. For example, a Charter School in NYC is based on gaming. “Game-making is especially well-suited to encourage meta-level reflection on the skills and processes that designer-players use in building systesms.' (Katie Salen, Gaming Literacies: A Game Design Study in Action'. Jl. Of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia (2007) 16 (3), 301-322.).
As the USA is not rushing toward a national curriculum, my view on this side of the fence from all the readings we have been given is that a national curriculum takes away evolution and new thinking, creativity and experimentation in education. It is taking a step back into a communist all get the same learning mindset. I am glad my children did their schooling in South Australia back in the 1990s when there was an openness to new ways that were not controlled and mandated by a central commission. 
What I see in various schools that are not public, similar to an Australian National School, controlled from a centralized government who may have their own agendas such as setting up with software companies and computer manufacturers what products will be thrust onto schools are schools willing to try something new and who will lead the next generations of learners. Learning needs to be student driven as well as the stake holder's agenda. For example, why are schools buying Microsoft Office, when Open Office, a superior product, is free? Who is pushing to keep schools 'up-todate' with hardware? Will schools have to waste their resources buying iPads for everyone?
What is interesting about USA non-public schools, including Charter Schools which are public schools but also have private funding, is that they can develop curriculum slightly different than public schools or schools under a national mandate. Within these schools, such as a game based school, or schools that allow social and collaborative usage, or robotics, and  [[Second Life|http://secondlife.neuage.us/]]  (as does MLC in Sydney does, I visited there a few years ago to bring  [[Second Life|http://secondlife.neuage.us/]]  to a school I was working at but after a lot of costs and development the head of the school axed the project) there is the future being carved out. 
Summarising Karen Dooley's article "How and why did literacy become so prominent?"

“That the message of a text is dependent upon what the reader does with the text. 

'That a textual message meaning is formed within a discourse-community to bring about a certain de-coding of the text.
Whose language is the correct one to create a literate society? '

'Whose interpretation are we following and why and will this produce students that will make choices that benefit the dominant group in society, those in power who a national curriculum is really out to serve.'

The spread of literacy in turn changed communication, which changed the educational system and – to some degree at least - the class and authority structure. Literacy became a demand tool: a passport to the regulatory systems of the industrial-bureaucratic state emerging in the modern era. 
[[Neuage]] 2005 [[PhD]]
Activity 2.3
"REVIEW OF MYREAD WEBSITE"
         
"INTRODUCTION"
[[MyRead]] is a project of the Australian Association for the Teaching of English (AATE) and the Australian Literacy Educators Association (ALEA). It has been funded by the Department of  Education, Science and Training (DEST). MyRead supports teachers of underperforming students in the middle years (Years 4 – 9). MyRead is based on the beliefs that: 
#All students can be successful readers
#All teachers are teachers of reading
#Teachers make a difference
#Monitoring and assessment inform teaching and learning
#Teachers need a repertoire of flexible practices

"SUMMARY"
This site attempts to support teachers with strategies to assist students who are not reading at an expected level. 

"CRITIQUE"
This body of work provides strategies of assistance for teachers with readers who are not at the level of their peers. Monitoring and assessment is important to identifying these students. However, it is easy to become lost in so many templates that little gets accomplished. If the amount of time that is spent going through this website was spent on the student who needs support then the reader would come out at a higher level. It is similar to the huge amount of time wasted on learning a software, such as TiddlyWiki, when that time could be put to good use engaging with material for learning. As this site illustrates the amount of time to find any thing useful compared to what could be accomplished 
with time well spent, such as engaging one on one with a student, is out of proportion. This site makes a mockery of Freebody and Luke's (2003) Four Roles model. They seem to spell out a single unitary model for reading and writing instead of showing that there are many pathways to assist a student into a better reading mind. In chapter 4 of Literacy as engaging with new forms of life: The 'Four Roles' Model, Freebody and Luke say that they 'found a large proportion of classroom time was devoted to textparticipation practices, often in conversational formats, exploring what might happen next, what characters might be feeling, what words mean and, in particular, how various elements of the text at 
hand might relate to students' everyday knowledge.' In other words it is within the group that performance may evolve.“Underperforming” is a qualitative term with layers of judgmental implications.  It would be the same as here in a school I taught at last year in New York City with children who lived in shelters, abusive homes, or had English as a second language saying they were under performing. They may be over performing compared to other children in the shelter, or in their overcrowded tenement apartment or compared to others in their family as they are the only one 
that can read in the family. 

This year I am doing my prac teaching in a school that charges $30,000 per student and in 4th grade they love reading more than playing computer games or playing outside or watching television. They love to read aloud. However, I could point out a tenyear old and say she was an underperformer in the group even though he may be reading at a much higher level than children in a public school. 

The Vignettes included on this website could be here in NYC or anywhere else of course. Instead of separating underperformers and overachievers and all the other variations they should be together and from my own observations and experience those who start off the year far behind will catch up. They may need extra assistance after school but they will want to be a part of the group. It then becomes the responsibility of the teacher to raise the standards of the group. This is discussed in the MYREAD section; Connecting Students To Learning Through Explicit Teaching “Implementing focused lessons.Explicit teaching is not just merely giving students clear directions or even stating the learning goals at the beginning of a lesson – it is a way of thinking about and acting out teaching and learning in a principled way throughout the lesson (from assessment through to planning, implementation and 
review).”
  
"CONCLUSION"
Teaching can be very individualized within an institutionalized setting. The MyRead http://www.myread.org website is a tool that provides suggestions. Underperforming, like not being up to snuff, or any number of judgemental notions leads readers – usually teachers, or caregivers – to look for strategies of assistance. By placing a 'winner' logo on their website they extend to the casual reader of their site that they have have achieved a high level of 
demostratable expertise on their site.There should be a link on the site to their wiki http://wikidlinks.wikispaces.com/A+thinking+culture+at+OLMC which gives opportunities for interaction and collaboration.
Activity 2.4 Terrell Neuage
          1. Barbie PC, a pink, Barbie themed computer for girls comes with Barbie Fashion Designer. The    Barbie PC comes loaded with a little more then half of the educational software found on Mattel's counterpart computer for boys, the Hot Wheels PC. Comes with: Body Works, a program that teaches human anatomy and 3dimensional visualization, Logical Journey of the 
Zoombinis, The Clue Finders Math 912, Compton's Complete Reference Collection, and Kid  Pix Studio.  and a thinking game called Logical Journey of the Zoombinis

Note: Customers who ordered $699 PCs festooned with Barbie decals are out of luck this holiday season: Patriot Computer, which manufactured the Barbie PC as well as the Hot Wheels PC, has filed for bankruptcy. December 21, 2000 1:15 PM PST Bankruptcy crashes the Barbie PC By Michael 
Kanellos  Staff Writer, CNET News  viewed April 20th 2010  

Firstly, I believe this article is way out of date. The book is from 2001 – ancient history for what we 
should be reading now and yes there were more gender issues a decade ago. We would have been better 
served reading current research or a book such as Career Decisions in Computer Technology Fields: 
Influences, Barriers, and Gender Issues (2008). “This study examines similarities and dissimilarities of students  
enrolled in computer technology programs and noncomputer programs at Career and Technology campuses in America.  
Barriers and influences were evaluated to determine if gender played a part in selecting a career.The results are 
illuminating and point out the processes and barriers to effective efficient and fulfilling career choices."
Here are some other books from a couple of years ago we could have been directed to:
Barbercheck, Mary et al. (eds.). Women, Science, and Technology, 2nd edition.. New York: 
Routledge, 2008. (Description, Contents, and Read Inside the Book).
Kitetu, Catherine Wawasi. Gender, Science and Technology: Perspectives from Africa. Dakar, 
Senegal: CODESRIA, 2008. (Brief Description).
Lynch, Julianne (ed.). Gender and IT: Ongoing Challenges for Computing and Information 
Technology Education in Australian Secondary Schools. Sydney: Australian Curriculum Studies 
Association, 2008. (Information).
Phipps, Alison. Women in Science, Engineering and Technology: three decades of UK initiatives. 
Staffordshire, UK: Trentham Books, 2008. (Brief Description).
Schiebinger, Londa (ed.). Gendered Innovations in Science and Engineering. Palo Alto, CA: 
Stanford University Press, 2008. (Introduction and Table of Contents)    (Interview with Editor).
Senft, Theresa M. Camgirls: Celebrity and Community in the Age of Social Networks. New York: 
Peter Lang, 2008. (Brief Description and Table of Contents)  (Author's description of dissertation on 
which the book is based)
Williams, F. Mary and Carolyn J. Emerson. Becoming Leaders: A Practical Handbook for Women 
in Engineering, Science, and Technology. Reston, VA: American Society of Civil Engineers, 2008. 
(Brief Description and Read Inside the Book). 
And there have been many since. 
Secondly – let's get with the way it is now – at least in Western Society  “It used to be that dolls held 
girls' interest at least through elementary school. But these days, girls are dropping such playthings at 
ever younger ages, largely replacing the childhood mainstay with technologydriven activities, even as 
the toy industry battles to attract the coveted market with new products.” Girls abandon dolls for Web
based toys By Lini S. Kadaba Inquirer Staff Writer 
http://www.philly.com/inquirer/image/20100331_Girls_abandon_dolls_for_Webbased_toys.html 
viewed 12 April 2010
How about Nerd Girls Blog? At http://www.nerdgirls.com/blog/read/connectwithcomputerscience/ 
Social site games? Mafia for example, something I have never played but on Facebook I see a lot of 
females playing it. 
Some of the stereotypes that the authors are pointing out here are:
Boys are competent with technology and they do not like reading.   In general, hegemonic masculinity 
in Australian state schools sees boys rewarded for being 'tough', independent, aggressive and practical, 
rather than intellectual. 
Girls are not interested in technology and they are not competent with technology.
        A key finding of the AAUW study TechSavvy: Educating Girls in the New Computer Age 
        (AAUW 2000a) was that girls' reservations about participating in computer cultures were well 
        founded. However, looking at a large variety of websites I believe this is no longer true. Using 
        my own limited research from going to Internet Cafés in India, Cambodia, Viet Nam, China, 
        Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong, Mexico and many places in between over the past few years I 
        have seen as many females as males (and I mean locals, not westerns checking their emails) 
        playing computer games – and the shooting them up sort too. My colleague (a female professor 
        in the UK from Singapore) for a project I am doing on how people extend the lives of loved 
        ones on the Internet using Farmville, webmemorials and etc. surely has no reservations about 
        using computers and the ones I am doing research on this with are all females. As an exdirector 
        of technology and a computer teacher looking for a job in New York City I am a bit dismayed 
        that the last four or five jobs I went for I came about second to the female who was hired. I am 
        not quite sure who actually believes that computing is the domain of males. 
     2. Where do these stereotypes come from? (again note that this is from a decade ago)
       Advertisers [advertising for computers, computer peripherals, such as printers and scanners, and 
        software tends to emphasize  overtly in the early 1990s  the 'boys and their toys' domain of 
        digital technologies (Hellman 1996; Sofia 1996; Greene 1998; Chaika 2000)]
       Business [that the dominance of a maleoriented business culture in software development and 
        icon or interface naming (e.g. the 'desktop', the egocentric 'my briefcase') has worked to exclude 
        women from participating in using and producing digital technologies. (Weizenbaum 1984; 
        Bowers 1988; Marvin 1988; Noble 1991; Kling 1996)]
     3. How are the authors suggesting that these stereotypes might be challenged through our teaching 
        practices?
By undertaking activities designed to interrupt the boys' (and their teachers') unproblematic 
endorsement of hegemonic masculinities. This involved three strategies:
 providing the boys with opportunities, choices and 'power' not routinely ascribed to boys with a 
history of trouble making;
 providing the boys with consistent and clearly articulated feedback concerning their abilities to display 
those skills  in literacy and technology which they are routinely expected not to possess;
 demonstrating a way of thinking about and responding to 'boys in schools' that saw them in positive 
rather than negative, productive rather than disruptive and transformative rather than stereotypical ways.
     4. What kinds of gender issues do you perceive/foresee in your community/teaching setting?
“Cool Teen Sites  Sites for Teenagers” available on the girl power site http://www.girl.com.au/  notice 
the .au for the domain source origin.
I have not seen gender issues in the last two schools that I have taught in ( At a  public K – 8 school I 
was the IT person and the technologies integrator. We had 30 Macbooks on a cart that I would wheel in 
to the class and we would do our work. In kindergarten or first grade we may  be doing drawing or 
using http://www.starfall.com/ for reading. In second and third grade we used Comic Life, Office, 
iVideo and so forth. We worked individually and in groups. Gender never played a part in the learning 
or use of computers or what we did. In a previous private school the students in grades 6 – 12 had their 
own computers which they brought to class and we collaborated on projects. When computing was an 
elective at my private schools only boys signed up and were in classes of robotics and 3D animation in 
10th – 12 grade. Both boys and girls signed up for my courses in design using Adobe InDesign, 
Photoshop, Dreamweaver and etc. I had equal numbers of boys and girls. In a school from five years 
ago there were two schools, a boys academy and a girls academy. In middle school, starting in fifth 
grade, all girls were given a Mac laptop at the start of the year, the boys did not receive laptops. The 
thinking was that the girls needed a boost. This program began in the mid 1990s. I had mixed high
school classes and the boys lagged behind the girls in computer class. I do not think this was the proper 
way to go though maybe a decade ago it got girls more interested in the sciences, which it did. 
I have found this to be true  quoting from our article “This gender categorization work seems all the 
more ironic when we look at surveys such as that of the National Schools Board Foundation (cited in 
Luchetta 2000: 2). This polled 1735 households and found  among other things  that not only do girls 
use the Internet more than do the boys surveyed, but the girls use it more or educational purposes.”
In my current two schools I am doing my prac teaching in, both private schools, there are no issues. In 
one school I am teaching sixth grade Excel classes and there are eight girls and four boys – one of the 
larger classes at the school. At my public school I had 32 students per class, love the private school life. 
The girls are definitely more focused and quicker at learning Excel than the boys who will go over to a 
webpage for a ball score when I turn around.  I spend more time with the 4 boys than with the 8 girls. In 
my other school I am in a fourth grade class and if during a lesson a student needs to look up something 
for a project he or she will just go to one of a bank of computers at the back of the class and gather their 
information and come back to their seat. I see no difference in gender behaviour.  Gender and 
computers is becoming one of choices. My wife, a teacher for 25 years, 18 years in South Australia and 
seven in New York, bought a small pink computer, and calls it Turtle and has a colourful screensaver (of 
a turtle). She is a music teacher and uses the computer for commuication and for her work. I have a 17 
inch Entertainment PC with lots of programs and I like to do video editing and create webpages and art. 
The future of computing I do not see as an issue with gender but a choice of the individual.
     5. How would you write your own algebraic formula to best represent what is at stake here? 
     boys + reading + computers + supervision = literacy learning
Activity 2.4 extension 
Studying memetics engineering according to Knobel and Lankshear's could assist in the classroom by 
spreading contagious ideas to infect minds with particular ideas. One way we are doing this at the 
school I am doing my  4th grade prac teaching at is  by charting energy use in the classrooms. Of course 
helping children become aware of recycling and energy use has been in place at most schools for the 
past decade. We have daily patrols, two students going unannounced around the school with clipboard 
in hand, marking on their chart whether computers are off if not in use, airconditioners are not on 
when the window is open, Smartboards are off if not in use, properly recycled bins are in place with the 
correct trash in them and so on. 
Schools also have an unwritten in some and written in others that there can not be named fashion attire 
or gang symbols/colors in the classrooms. At the two private schools I am in now there is not much of a 
dress clothes other than common decency. Celebrity's, Wall Street bankers, and an assortment of the 
wealthy in New York City have children who dress like hobos. They do not wear brandnames, as 
trendy now looks like it is from a Goodwill Store. In my last public school students had to wear 
uniforms to avoid gang colours and the few who could afford trendy iconic clothes from getting beaten 
up. 
Activity 2.5 
To improve educational outcomes for Indigenous students and their communities is firstly to respect  other group's worldviews. 'Good teachers have an understanding of how children learn and they know how to tap into their students' natural ability to learn.' (Malin, 2004). Inviting students to have the power to influence their own learning increases their incorporation within the classroom. To do this teachers need to know each student as an individual  as a cultural being and as a learner. (Malin, 2004). This should be the case for any class and for the most part it is. Knowing the student's heritage and letting them share it with the class is the same as allowing Aboriginal Stories to be a part of the classroom. As  it is with any large city with a multicultural mix it is the blending of different pasts that makes the  present interesting and provides an evolutionary step in the classroom/community. These knowledge  structures – encapsulated and expressed through Stories whether it be African Americans from the  Bronx and Harlem, Indigenous Australians, Indigenous Americans, or any one of the many cultures that 
make up today's classroom, shared, will improve educational outcomes.”The essence of Aboriginal  worldviews is relatedness, defined as sets of conditions, processes, and practices that occur among and between elements of a particular place, and across contexts that are physical, social, political and intellectual.” (Martin 2006)

Everyone should know who they are and where they come from and this knowingness should be a collaborative community of learners who share their relatedness in the classroom. Part of Learning by observation: the four knowledge processes of experiencing, conceptualizing, 
analyzing, and applying knowledge among learners
Learning by personal trial and error – encouragement to take risks and problem solve
Learning inreal life activities: an appropriate curriculum that reflects local and wider community interests, issues, and life world practices
Contextspecific learning: new knowledge for students has a context to which the students can relate 
Learning is person orientated rather than information orientated the life world of the learner central to pedagogy
The group is more important than the individual – students and teachers have equal authority over learning
Learning is holistic – the whole rather the bits and pieces
Learning relies on visual and spatial skills
A reduced emphasis on the role of spoken language – allowing silences and absence
    
REFERENCES
Harris, S. (1984) 'Aboriginal learning styles and formal schooling'. In M. Christie, S. Harris & D. 
McLay (Eds.) Teaching Aboriginal Children: Millingimbi and Beyond, Institute of Applied Aboriginal 
Studies, Mount Lawley, WA.
Malin, M ‘They Listen and They’ve Got Respect: Culture and Pedagogy’ in Parington, G (ed.) (2004) 
Perspectives on Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander Education, Thomson, Social Sciences Press, 
South Melbourne. 
Martin, K (2007). 'The intersection of Aboriginal knowledges, Aboriginal literacies and New Learning 
Pedagogies for Aboriginal students. 'In Healy, A. (ed.), Multiliteracies and diversity in education. (pp. 
5861). Oxford University Press.
What Works http://www.whatworks.edu.au/ is a federally funded initiative to document practical strategies and successful achievement in Indigenous education. Material is organised into 'case studies' and a series of 'core issues': one of these is literacy.Please take some time to explore the site and to look at some of the case studies. Try to pick a school context that relates to your own, or where you might end up teaching.
Write a brief description of how you might make use of this web site (<150 words) and distribute this amongst some other students. Try to comment on at least one other student's description.

[[Activity2.6 response]]

Literacy at home 

Following on from this material on Indigenous perspectives, our cultural knowledge is hampered somewhat by problems with how we understand the literate practices that occur outside of school, particularly within the home. This review article by Trevor Cairney summaries the situation: Bridging Home and School Literacy.

For early childhood educators, especially, try to get clear in your mind what the issues are here. Is Cairney suggesting any ways forward?

Getting our hands dirty 

Sooner or later, regardless of our level of schooling, or our subject area, we've got to get down to the nitty gritty of teaching texts and their structures. The next few readings go into some of the detail of how you might do this, and along the way, you'll get some practice at a level that adults and older adolescents can relate to.
The next reading by Geoff Bull and Michèle Anstey has a bunch of interesting investigations in it: What is text?.

Work through those items that you think will be of value and then post a short reflective piece on what you think you learnt from this chapter. To get you started, you may wish to comment on how the structure of the chapter helped you to follow the subject matter (if it did, of course).

[[Activity 2.7 response]]
This reading is as interactive as what it discusses with exercises such as filling in a grid on ones use of text and technology, and synthesis of  multi-modal semiotic systems.

The point of the limits of access to multitextual literature is still true in 2010 as it was six years ago when this was written. However, this is changing dramatically. Last summer, even in remote India I saw people texting on their mobile phones and I saw it earlier in very remote towns in Viet Nam and Cambodia. In towns with dirt roads as the main street of a city and people living in homes put together with rubbish people still had their phones and computers were surprisingly available. Internet growth has doubled in the past five years in India though it is still only 7%. Viet Nam has 26% Internet usage, (http://www.internetworldstats.com/stats.htm viewd may 05, 2010),  though compared to North America at 76.2, Australia at 80.1, and Iceland at 93.2, new texts (as discussed in 'The Literacy Labyrinth', 2004) are not there to be shared.    

As we live in this world of marketability the end results of texts are possible at odds between the sellers of images who are partnered with the producers of goods and those who do not want to be swallowed up by cultural constructs that are not in sync with their beliefs and values.
The next item draws together a number of threads from the earlier readings (and their associated activities) and foreshadows some of the themes to follow.

Please attempt some of the tasks in Pauline Harris's chapter on A sociocultural model of reading.

As you read the chapter, try to find some of the connections with the other unit materials. Try to rationalise your experiences as a reader in light of the unit materials, and write a short paragraph or two for other students to consider.

Then read some others' contributions and try to account for the diversity that students are reporting (hopefully!).

Schooling levels 

Most schooling systems make a distinction between the primary and secondary years, although the way this is done is not always the same. More recently the 'middle years' designation has complicated matters a little, and some providers mask the issue by running from pre-school (or earlier) right through to post-compulsory education. But at some point it needs to be recognised that the literacy requirements of students, if they are to continue developing, must undergo an important and systematic shift in a way that gets aligned somehow with the traditional (or emergent) subject areas. The explanation behind this is quite complicated, but it is imperative that you gain an appreciation of why this is the case.

[[My response to activity 2.8]]
The next reading is admittedly fairly difficult, but it is well worth the effort in trying to understand it. It would be fair to say that it is one of those articles that is potentially 'earth shattering' if you grasp the full sense of what is being said.

Here it is: Frances Christie's Learning the literacies of primary and secondary schooling.

Try to summarise Christie's argument. What theories of language and society is she making use of? What additional reading would you suggest someone undertake if they wanted to get to the bottom of this? How might you apply these ideas within your own teaching context?

[[Activity 2.9 response]]
Christie argues that the two 'traditional' ways of learning literacies; learning literacy rules in the first years of schooling and that learning literacy is a 'natural' process  are myths. It is in the simplification of learning literacy that Christie sees as harmful. Chomsky's view that learning language is innate and that it is best learned as one learns speech in a 'natural way' is not what we are finding is how literacy becomes useful  As well the theory that a child has mastered literacy by the age of eight or nine seems to deskills teachers, and will turn this generation into grammatical refugees on Facebook.

In the section 'Spoken and written language' Christie points out that with 'the advent of literacy' the writer and reader could share information away from where the story takes place.  This brings into play the nature of intertextuality, first developed by Julia Kristeva (1980, 1984, 1989), in connection with the numerous implicit references in each text to other texts. No text is written in complete isolation from other texts nor can it stand entirely by itself. 

Christie is taking a Functional Linguistics perspective with the emphasis on grammar.  PISA (The OECD Programme for International Student Assessment) has defined “literacy as the ongoing acquisition of “an expanding set of knowledge skills and strategies” and reading as the ability to “understand, use and reflect on written text” (OECD, 2003, p. 108).  Functional Linguistics begins with social context, and looks at how language both acts upon, and is constrained by the social context. (Neuage, 2005). The social function of communication, as theorized within FL, can range from entertainment, to learning, to communicating news and information. “The value of a theory”, Halliday wrote, “lies in the use that can be made of it, and I have always considered a theory of language to be essentially consumer oriented” (1985a, p. 7). Central to Functional Linguistics is the concept of “stratification”. Linguistic function is divided for the purposes of analysis into its social context, its semantic loading, its deployment of a lexico-grammatical selection, and its phonological-graphological choices.

As Christie points out, to many people grammar refers only to the basis for “proper” communication. Presentation of our language to others signals many things: for example, our command of language, our social position, our educational level and much about ourselves. “Improper” grammar is thus often associated socially with laziness, low self-esteem or being a “foreigner”; except perhaps on Facebook, e-mails, blogs., and all things World Wide Web where I can not tell whether it is laziness, low self-esteem, or what produces such poor and improper grammar. However, the focus in Internet chat is on constructing effective or meaningful messages quickly, is this an excuse? Traditional rules of grammar are replaced with a new set of emerging grammar protocols – and the meaning of “grammar” for analysis of this shift must move to that of formal linguistics, where grammar is examined first as a system of regulation of word order, established consensually within given languages, and again within their social sub-sections, to optimize communication. In other words, to make the sorts of “inclusive or exclusive” social regulatory decisions based on grammatical “correctness” which dominate the popular understanding of the term “grammar”, we must first be able to undertake the purely “descriptive” work of the formal linguist, in identifying which elements in a given language or “dialect” are considered standard or variant.  Should we even be teaching grammar to anyone any more or should we move over and let the Internet take over (apologies to Jimi Hendrix “'move over rover let jimi take over'”).

Applying these ideas within my own teaching context has been and is an exciting opportunity. As I have been a computer teacher in grades K – 12 for the past seven years. I make it my business to work with students who are the writer of digital texts. From second graders creating storyboards in 'Comic Life' to currently working with sixth grade students with MIT's Scratch (a great introduction to programming – better than 'Small Basic') and  [[Second Life|http://secondlife.neuage.us/]]  projects as well as using Facebook as a narrative (see the Abe Lincoln Facebook page – http://www.facebook.com/pages/Abraham-Honest-Abe-Lincoln/12336859853). Grammar is very important in this digital age. One of my pet peeves is the incredible sloppiness of emails (whether from students, friends, professors, family, work and etc) and the even worse grammar in Facebook and the other hundred or so [[social sites]] I belong to (actually I do research on social media so I have joined more than one-hundred in the past decade with at least 60 still going strong). I insist that students check grammar as well as spelling in every digital tool we use: Power Point, 3D animation, movie making (here is an example from my 7th grade class in interactive poetry scripting class – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3mMwXB-TXg), as well as many other applications. What is essential is that literacy comes first – before anything is sent. We have had 20 years of web based writing and those who have grown up using this are showing that they missed the grammar spaceship and they are waving frantically in outer space with no syntax to hold onto. What schools can do is work with students to become literate online. 
As I am doing my prac teaching in the USA and have only taught K-12 in the USA this site will not be of use for teaching in New York. However, I will be doing a ten-week prac teaching in South Australia in July – September 2010. My teaching experience will be at a private school, Torrens Valley Christian School. I believe there are no Indigenous students at this school, though there were two several years ago. 
The reason I think this website is particular relevant to this school is because there are no indigenous students enrolled and the students have little contact with indigenous students in their daily lives In the north eastern suburbs of Adelaide so it is therefore critical that I bring increased awareness of issues to these somewhat shelter students. Furthermore it will be a great tool to increase my own awareness as an American of the complexities of this environment. 

To quote from CATHERINE LISA DICKINSON in the non-tiddler (our discussion group for this activity)

“I realise that it is still very important to teach aboriginal culture - even more so where students do not have access to it or, if there are aboriginal students, they are more likely to feel isolated and cut off. It's great to have this resource and I expect I will be using it a lot. It seems likely that building partnerships with aboriginal communities and schools with higher aboriginal populations will be the best way to approach this”
>The following is not part of my word count for Assignment 2.
For my masters at Deakin in 1995 "[[Influence of the World Wide Web on literature|http://neuage.org/masters1.html]]" I called it [[litweberature]], though that did not catch on as an academic term but I ploughed forward with a [[PhD]] on this and now I am back to it again. Hopefully this will be an addition to past studies and not a repeat.  

It is interesting coming back to this a decade later and seeing the same ideas being used but at more integrated levels. In the 1990s we did not integrate it into the curriculum and I thought that it would just gradually become the overall mashup that we refer to as education. I believe we have had a case of where society left the curriculum in the dust and now there seems to be a scramble to what is already being used in the community to say it is part of the curriculum. 

This new literacy has been out of the hands of the schools for years, with children in pre-K (kindergarten) now having an opportunity to become literate in this new literacy manifestation.  Do we need an academic to tell us today’s kids grow up online? As a single parent in the 1990s I encouraged this with my children - this was the new literacy when they were in primary school. We were at home with our Commodore 64 and my 10 year old was writing code and we were all experimenting with hyperlink in 1992. It has taken a long time for educators to catch up with this. The World Wide Web is twenty years old - we should be much further in education than we are with meaning making in this environment. 

Students are using community sharing and making friends world-wide within virtual worlds. We have used [[Second Life|http://secondlife.neuage.us/]] in high school (see [[101 uses for SL|http://warburton.typepad.com/disruptive/2007/03/101_use_for_sl_.html]] in the classroom in "[[Disruptive technologies in education|http://warburton.typepad.com/disruptive/]]". Distance Ed Victoria has proposed a project to build a house in SL to teach students about fire hazards. [[See skoolaborate|http://www.skoolaborate.com/]]. I met the person who started this four years ago where they started at Methodist Ladies‟ College, Sydney, to start an Island at our school In Manhattan. Get your school involved with this and you will have new ways of learning in virtual classrooms. Of course this is not new, we did this at University of SA in the mid-1990s but this is today's buzz.
![[social sites]] has been shifted.
>>Nevertheless on with [[Assignment 2 Questions]].
|Please read this table and fill in the mid section as you go|c
| ''Checklist'' |>|>|>| ''Your Take'' |>|>|>|bgcolor(#ffA500): ''Our Take'' |h
| Item | Done Well | Done | Struggled | Skipped |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done Well |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done |bgcolor(#ffA500): Struggled |bgcolor(#ffA500): Skipped |h
|The response uses an appropriate method of justification | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The response sets out (or refers to) some relevant criteria | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The response reaches a well-supported conclusion | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|Please read this table and fill in the mid section as you go|c
| ''Checklist'' |>|>|>| ''Your Take'' |>|>|>|bgcolor(#ffA500): ''Our Take'' |h
| Item | Done Well | Done | Struggled | Skipped |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done Well |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done |bgcolor(#ffA500): Struggled |bgcolor(#ffA500): Skipped |h
|The response makes explicit the reading strategies being followed | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The response explains the method of criticism (critique) being used | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The response considers the context, audience, and purpose of the article being critiqued | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|Please read this table and fill in the mid section as you go|c
| ''Checklist'' |>|>|>| ''Your Take'' |>|>|>|bgcolor(#ffA500): ''Our Take'' |h
| Item | Done Well | Done | Struggled | Skipped |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done Well |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done |bgcolor(#ffA500): Struggled |bgcolor(#ffA500): Skipped |h
|The response clearly identifies some specific literacy requirements at one of the recognised levels of schooling (and optionally, within a nominated subject area) | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The response acknowledges at least two of the following categories of student: Indigenous, non-Indigenous, English as an Additional Language, and special needs | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The response makes practical teaching suggestions for addressing the literacy requirements mentioned | [X] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
[[GeneralAssessmentCriteria]]
[[Assessment criteria for Q1]]
[[Assessment criteria for Q2]]
[[Assessment criteria for Q3]]
Assignment 2 Questions
Dr.Terrell-Neuage, 8 May 2010(created 11 February 2010)
!!!This set of Assignment Questions pertains to ETL411 Teaching the Curriculum 1 / Integrating Literacy, Semester 1, 2010.
![[Question 1]]: How well are the current Australian national curriculum efforts integrating literacy, and in particular digital literacies?  Reference to the draft K–10 Australian Curriculum, and other ACARA documentation. 
![[Question 2]]: Read and critique Chris Waterman's recent article in Teacher Magazine entitled Lead the Revolution.
![[Question 3]]: Describe some of the specific literacy requirements applying to your intended level of schooling (or subject area). How are you going to teach to them?
!DO NOT USE TOWARD WORD COUNT FOR ASSIGNMENT TWO - REFERENCES TO ASYNCHRONOUOS/SYNCHRONOUS ONLY

Asynchronous communication is communication taking place at different times or over a certain period of time. Several currently used examples are e-mail, electronic mailing lists, e-mail based conferencing programs, UseNet newsgroups, Twitter, Facebook and messaging programs. Asynchronous communication requires computer conferencing programs and electronic mailing lists that reside on a server that distributes the messages that users send to it such as using iChat. Any computer user with e-mail and a connection to the Internet can engage in asynchronous communication. Web-based conferencing programs that distribute many messages, or messages containing attachments, require more system power and a current model computer with a sound card and speakers and a fast connection to the Internet (Aokk, 1995; Siemieniuch & Sinclair, 1994).

see [[Synchronous communication]]
As discussed in [[Activity 2.7 response]] Australia has a strong standing for Internet usage.
>Australian Internet Usage
*[img[Australian Internet Usage|http://neuage.info/tiddler/InternetUsageAustralia.PNG]]
As discussed in [[Activity 2.7 response]] Australia has a strong standing for Internet usage.
!World Internet Usage

>Australian Penetrations
*[img[Australian Penetrations|http://neuage.info/tiddler/InternetPenetration.PNG]]
! Please do not count toward word count, this is just mussings on Computer Mediated Communication.
The first issue addressed in contemporary Computer Mediated Communication studies is the insistence that [[CMC]] is not in itself an isolated “driver” of communicative innovation. Most theorists are opposed to technological determinism, and consider rather that [[CMC]]s are in themselves driven by precisely the same processes which structure those communicative acts, which they subsequently enable. 
A CheatSheet is available at [[TiddlyPocketBook|http://tiddlypocketbook.com/]]. Or from the [[VIRTuální UNIVerzita|http://www.virtuniv.cz/images/e/ed/Tiddlywiki_cheatsheet.pdf]]. And you could always develop your own and tuck it away in a tiddler somewhere.
/***
|Name|CheckboxPlugin|
|Source|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#CheckboxPlugin|
|Documentation|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#CheckboxPluginInfo|
|Version|2.4.0|
|Author|Eric Shulman|
|License|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#LegalStatements|
|~CoreVersion|2.1|
|Type|plugin|
|Description|Add checkboxes to your tiddler content|
This plugin extends the TiddlyWiki syntax to allow definition of checkboxes that can be embedded directly in tiddler content.  Checkbox states are preserved by:
* by setting/removing tags on specified tiddlers,
* or, by setting custom field values on specified tiddlers,
* or, by saving to a locally-stored cookie ID,
* or, automatically modifying the tiddler content (deprecated)
When an ID is assigned to the checkbox, it enables direct programmatic access to the checkbox DOM element, as well as creating an entry in TiddlyWiki's config.options[ID] internal data.  In addition to tracking the checkbox state, you can also specify custom javascript for programmatic initialization and onClick event handling for any checkbox, so you can provide specialized side-effects in response to state changes.
!!!!!Documentation
>see ~CheckboxPluginInfo
!!!!!Revisions
<<<
2008.01.08 [*.*.*] plugin size reduction: documentation moved to ~CheckboxPluginInfo
2008.01.05 [2.4.0] set global "window.place" to current checkbox element when processing checkbox clicks.  This allows init/beforeClick/afterClick handlers to reference RELATIVE elements, including using "story.findContainingTiddler(place)".  Also, wrap handlers in "function()" so "return" can be used within handler code.
|please see ~CheckboxPluginInfo for additional revision details|
2005.12.07 [0.9.0] initial BETA release
<<<
!!!!!Code
***/
//{{{
version.extensions.CheckboxPlugin = {major: 2, minor: 4, revision:0 , date: new Date(2008,1,5)};
//}}}
//{{{
config.checkbox = { refresh: { tagged:true, tagging:true, container:true } };
config.formatters.push( {
	name: "checkbox",
	match: "\\[[xX_ ][\\]\\=\\(\\{]",
	lookahead: "\\[([xX_ ])(=[^\\s\\(\\]{]+)?(\\([^\\)]*\\))?({[^}]*})?({[^}]*})?({[^}]*})?\\]",
	handler: function(w) {
		var lookaheadRegExp = new RegExp(this.lookahead,"mg");
		lookaheadRegExp.lastIndex = w.matchStart;
		var lookaheadMatch = lookaheadRegExp.exec(w.source)
		if(lookaheadMatch && lookaheadMatch.index == w.matchStart) {
			// get params
			var checked=(lookaheadMatch[1].toUpperCase()=="X");
			var id=lookaheadMatch[2];
			var target=lookaheadMatch[3];
			if (target) target=target.substr(1,target.length-2).trim(); // trim off parentheses
			var fn_init=lookaheadMatch[4];
			var fn_clickBefore=lookaheadMatch[5];
			var fn_clickAfter=lookaheadMatch[6];
			var tid=story.findContainingTiddler(w.output);  if (tid) tid=tid.getAttribute("tiddler");
			var srctid=w.tiddler?w.tiddler.title:null;
			config.macros.checkbox.create(w.output,tid,srctid,w.matchStart+1,checked,id,target,config.checkbox.refresh,fn_init,fn_clickBefore,fn_clickAfter);
			w.nextMatch = lookaheadMatch.index + lookaheadMatch[0].length;
		}
	}
} );
config.macros.checkbox = {
	handler: function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		if(!(tiddler instanceof Tiddler)) { // if no tiddler passed in try to find one
			var here=story.findContainingTiddler(place);
			if (here) tiddler=store.getTiddler(here.getAttribute("tiddler"))
		}
		var srcpos=0; // "inline X" not applicable to macro syntax
		var target=params.shift(); if (!target) target="";
		var defaultState=params[0]=="checked"; if (defaultState) params.shift();
		var id=params.shift(); if (id && !id.length) id=null;
		var fn_init=params.shift(); if (fn_init && !fn_init.length) fn_init=null;
		var fn_clickBefore=params.shift();
		if (fn_clickBefore && !fn_clickBefore.length) fn_clickBefore=null;
		var fn_clickAfter=params.shift();
		if (fn_clickAfter && !fn_clickAfter.length) fn_clickAfter=null;
		var refresh={ tagged:true, tagging:true, container:false };
		this.create(place,tiddler.title,tiddler.title,0,defaultState,id,target,refresh,fn_init,fn_clickBefore,fn_clickAfter);
	},
	create: function(place,tid,srctid,srcpos,defaultState,id,target,refresh,fn_init,fn_clickBefore,fn_clickAfter) {
		// create checkbox element
		var c = document.createElement("input");
		c.setAttribute("type","checkbox");
		c.onclick=this.onClickCheckbox;
		c.srctid=srctid; // remember source tiddler
		c.srcpos=srcpos; // remember location of "X"
		c.container=tid; // containing tiddler (may be null if not in a tiddler)
		c.tiddler=tid; // default target tiddler 
		c.refresh = {};
		c.refresh.container = refresh.container;
		c.refresh.tagged = refresh.tagged;
		c.refresh.tagging = refresh.tagging;
		place.appendChild(c);
		// set default state
		c.checked=defaultState;
		// track state in config.options.ID
		if (id) {
			c.id=id.substr(1); // trim off leading "="
			if (config.options[c.id]!=undefined)
				c.checked=config.options[c.id];
			else
				config.options[c.id]=c.checked;
		}
		// track state in (tiddlername|tagname) or (fieldname@tiddlername)
		if (target) {
			var pos=target.indexOf("@");
			if (pos!=-1) {
				c.field=pos?target.substr(0,pos):"checked"; // get fieldname (or use default "checked")
				c.tiddler=target.substr(pos+1); // get specified tiddler name (if any)
				if (!c.tiddler || !c.tiddler.length) c.tiddler=tid; // if tiddler not specified, default == container
				if (store.getValue(c.tiddler,c.field)!=undefined)
					c.checked=(store.getValue(c.tiddler,c.field)=="true"); // set checkbox from saved state
			} else {
				var pos=target.indexOf("|"); if (pos==-1) var pos=target.indexOf(":");
				c.tag=target;
				if (pos==0) c.tag=target.substr(1); // trim leading "|" or ":"
				if (pos>0) { c.tiddler=target.substr(0,pos); c.tag=target.substr(pos+1); }
				if (!c.tag.length) c.tag="checked";
				var t=store.getTiddler(c.tiddler);
				if (t && t.tags)
					c.checked=t.isTagged(c.tag); // set checkbox from saved state
			}
		}
		// trim off surrounding { and } delimiters from init/click handlers
		if (fn_init) c.fn_init="(function(){"+fn_init.trim().substr(1,fn_init.length-2)+"})()";
		if (fn_clickBefore) c.fn_clickBefore="(function(){"+fn_clickBefore.trim().substr(1,fn_clickBefore.length-2)+"})()";
		if (fn_clickAfter) c.fn_clickAfter="(function(){"+fn_clickAfter.trim().substr(1,fn_clickAfter.length-2)+"})()";
		c.init=true; c.onclick(); c.init=false; // compute initial state and save in tiddler/config/cookie
	},
	onClickCheckbox: function(event) {
		window.place=this;
		if (this.init && this.fn_init) // custom function hook to set initial state (run only once)
			{ try { eval(this.fn_init); } catch(e) { displayMessage("Checkbox init error: "+e.toString()); } }
		if (!this.init && this.fn_clickBefore) // custom function hook to override changes in checkbox state
			{ try { eval(this.fn_clickBefore) } catch(e) { displayMessage("Checkbox onClickBefore error: "+e.toString()); } }
		if (this.id)
			// save state in config AND cookie (only when ID starts with 'chk')
			{ config.options[this.id]=this.checked; if (this.id.substr(0,3)=="chk") saveOptionCookie(this.id); }
		if (this.srctid && this.srcpos>0 && (!this.id || this.id.substr(0,3)!="chk") && !this.tag && !this.field) {
			// save state in tiddler content only if not using cookie, tag or field tracking
			var t=store.getTiddler(this.srctid); // put X in original source tiddler (if any)
			if (t && this.checked!=(t.text.substr(this.srcpos,1).toUpperCase()=="X")) { // if changed
				t.set(null,t.text.substr(0,this.srcpos)+(this.checked?"X":"_")+t.text.substr(this.srcpos+1),null,null,t.tags);
				if (!story.isDirty(t.title)) story.refreshTiddler(t.title,null,true);
				store.setDirty(true);
			}
		}
		if (this.field) {
			if (this.checked && !store.tiddlerExists(this.tiddler))
				store.saveTiddler(this.tiddler,this.tiddler,"",config.options.txtUserName,new Date());
			// set the field value in the target tiddler
			store.setValue(this.tiddler,this.field,this.checked?"true":"false");
			// DEBUG: displayMessage(this.field+"@"+this.tiddler+" is "+this.checked);
		}
		if (this.tag) {
			if (this.checked && !store.tiddlerExists(this.tiddler))
				store.saveTiddler(this.tiddler,this.tiddler,"",config.options.txtUserName,new Date());
			var t=store.getTiddler(this.tiddler);
			if (t) {
				var tagged=(t.tags && t.tags.indexOf(this.tag)!=-1);
				if (this.checked && !tagged) { t.tags.push(this.tag); store.setDirty(true); }
				if (!this.checked && tagged) { t.tags.splice(t.tags.indexOf(this.tag),1); store.setDirty(true); }
			}
			// if tag state has been changed, update display of corresponding tiddlers (unless they are in edit mode...)
			if (this.checked!=tagged) {
				if (this.refresh.tagged) {
					if (!story.isDirty(this.tiddler)) // the TAGGED tiddler in view mode
						story.refreshTiddler(this.tiddler,null,true); 
					else // the TAGGED tiddler in edit mode (with tags field)
						config.macros.checkbox.refreshEditorTagField(this.tiddler,this.tag,this.checked);
				}
				if (this.refresh.tagging)
					if (!story.isDirty(this.tag)) story.refreshTiddler(this.tag,null,true); // the TAGGING tiddler
			}
		}
		if (!this.init && this.fn_clickAfter) // custom function hook to react to changes in checkbox state
			{ try { eval(this.fn_clickAfter) } catch(e) { displayMessage("Checkbox onClickAfter error: "+e.toString()); } }
		// refresh containing tiddler (but not during initial rendering, or we get an infinite loop!) (and not when editing container)
		if (!this.init && this.refresh.container && this.container!=this.tiddler)
			if (!story.isDirty(this.container)) story.refreshTiddler(this.container,null,true); // the tiddler CONTAINING the checkbox
		return true;
	},
	refreshEditorTagField: function(title,tag,set) {
		var tagfield=story.getTiddlerField(title,"tags");
		if (!tagfield||tagfield.getAttribute("edit")!="tags") return; // if no tags field in editor (i.e., custom template)
		var tags=tagfield.value.readBracketedList();
		if (tags.contains(tag)==set) return; // if no change needed
		if (set) tags.push(tag); // add tag
		else tags.splice(tags.indexOf(tag),1); // remove tag
		for (var t=0;t<tags.length;t++) tags[t]=String.encodeTiddlyLink(tags[t]);
		tagfield.value=tags.join(" "); // reassemble tag string (with brackets as needed)
		return;
	}
}
//}}}
Background: #cff
Foreground: #234
PrimaryPale: #8cf
PrimaryLight: #600
PrimaryMid: #500
PrimaryDark: #014
SecondaryPale: #66f
SecondaryLight: #f9f
SecondaryMid: #db4
SecondaryDark: #841
TertiaryPale: #ffc
TertiaryLight: #ccc
TertiaryMid: #39c
TertiaryDark: #ffo
Error: #f88
/***
|Name|CommentPlugin|
|Source|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#CommentPlugin|
|Documentation|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#CommentPluginInfo|
|Version|2.9.3|
|Author|Eric Shulman|
|License|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#LegalStatements|
|~CoreVersion|2.1|
|Type|plugin|
|Description|automatically insert formatted comments into tiddler content|
!!!!!Documentation
>see ~CommentPluginInfo
!!!!!Configuration
>see ~CommentPluginInfo
!!!!!Revisions
<<<
2009.04.10 [2.9.3] invoke autoSaveChanges() after adding a comment
| please see ~CommentPluginInfo for previous revision details |
2006.04.20 [1.0.0] initial release
<<<
!!!!!Code
***/
//{{{
version.extensions.CommentPlugin= {major: 2, minor: 9, revision: 3, date: new Date(2009,4,10)};

config.macros.comment= {
	marker: '/%'+'comment'+'%/',
	fmt: "__''%subject%''__\n^^posted by %who% on %when%^^\n<<<\n%message%\n<<<\n",
	datefmt: 'DDD, MMM DDth, YYYY at hh12:0mm:0ss am',
	tags: '',
	reverse: false,
	handler: function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramstring,tiddler) {
		var span=createTiddlyElement(place,'span');
		var here=story.findContainingTiddler(place);
		if (here) var tid=here.getAttribute('tiddler');  // containing tiddler title
		span.setAttribute('here',tid);
		var target=(params[0]&&params[0].length&&params[0]!='here')?params[0]:tid;  // target title
		span.setAttribute('target',target);
		var overwrite=(params[1]&&params[1].toLowerCase()=='overwrite'); if (overwrite) params.shift();
		span.setAttribute('overwrite',overwrite?'true':'false');
		var reverse=(params[1]&&params[1].toLowerCase()=='reverse'); if (reverse) params.shift();
		span.setAttribute('reverse',(reverse||this.reverse)?'true':'false');
		var marker=this.marker;
		if (params[1]&&params[1].substr(0,7)=='marker:') {
			var marker='/%'+params[1].substr(7)+'%/';
			params.shift();
		}
		span.setAttribute('marker',marker);
		var tags=(params[1]&&params[1].length)?params[1]:this.tags; // target tags
		span.setAttribute('tags',tags);
		var fmt=(params[2]&&params[2].length)?params[2]:this.fmt; // output format
		span.setAttribute('fmt',fmt.unescapeLineBreaks());
		var datefmt=(params[3]&&params[3].length)?params[3]:this.datefmt; // date format
		span.setAttribute('datefmt',datefmt.unescapeLineBreaks());
		var html=this.html;
		html=html.replace(/%nosubject%/g,(fmt.indexOf('%subject%')==-1)?'none':'block');
		html=html.replace(/%nomessage%/g,(fmt.indexOf('%message%')==-1)?'none':'block');
		var subjtxt=''; var msgtxt='';
		html=html.replace(/%subjtxt%/g,subjtxt);
		html=html.replace(/%msgtxt%/g,msgtxt);
		span.innerHTML=html;
	},
	html: "<form style='display:inline;margin:0;padding:0;'>\
		<div style='display:%nosubject%'>\
		subject:<br>\
		<input type='text' name='subject' title='enter subject text' style='width:100%' value='%subjtxt%'>\
		</div>\
		<div style='display:%nomessage%'>\
		message:<br>\
		<textarea name='message' rows='7' title='enter message text' \
			style='width:100%'>%msgtxt%</textarea>\
		</div>\
		<center>\
		<i>Please enter your information and then press</i>\
		<input type='button' value='post' onclick='\
			var s=this.form.subject; var m=this.form.message;\
			if (\"%nosubject%\"!=\"none\" && !s.value.length)\
				{ alert(\"Please enter a subject\"); s.focus(); return false; }\
			if (\"%nomessage%\"!=\"none\" && !m.value.length)\
				{ alert(\"Please enter a message\"); m.focus(); return false; }\
			var here=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"here\");\
			var reverse=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"reverse\")==\"true\";\
			var target=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"target\");\
			var marker=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"marker\");\
			var tags=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"tags\").readBracketedList();\
			var fmt=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"fmt\");\
			var datefmt=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"datefmt\");\
			var overwrite=this.form.parentNode.getAttribute(\"overwrite\")==\"true\";\
			config.macros.comment.addComment(here,reverse,target,tags,fmt,datefmt,\
				s.value,m.value,overwrite,marker);'>\
		</center>\
		</form>",
	addComment: function(here,reverse,target,newtags,fmt,datefmt,subject,message,overwrite,marker) {
		var UTC=new Date().convertToYYYYMMDDHHMMSSMMM();
		var rand=Math.random().toString();
		var who=config.options.txtUserName;
		var when=new Date().formatString(datefmt);
		target=target.replace(/%tiddler%/g,here);
		target=target.replace(/%UTC%/g,UTC);
		target=target.replace(/%random%/g,rand);
		target=target.replace(/%who%/g,who);
		target=target.replace(/%when%/g,when);
		target=target.replace(/%subject%/g,subject);
		var t=store.getTiddler(target);
		var text=t?t.text:'';
		var modifier=t?t.modifier:config.options.txtUserName;
		var modified=t?t.modified:new Date();
		var tags=t?t.tags:[];
		for(var i=0; i<newtags.length; i++) tags.pushUnique(newtags[i]);
		var fields=t?t.fields:{};
		var out=fmt;
		out=out.replace(/%tiddler%/g,here);
		out=out.replace(/%UTC%/g,UTC);
		out=out.replace(/%when%/g,when);
		out=out.replace(/%who%/g,who);
		out=out.replace(/%subject%/g,subject);
		out=out.replace(/%message%/g,message);
		var pos=text.indexOf(marker);
		if (pos==-1) pos=text.length; // no marker - insert at end
		else if (reverse) pos+=marker.length; // reverse order by inserting AFTER marker
		var newtxt=overwrite?out:(text.substr(0,pos)+out+text.substr(pos));
		store.saveTiddler(target,target,newtxt,modifier,modified,tags,fields);
		autoSaveChanges();
		if (document.getElementById(story.idPrefix+target))
			story.refreshTiddler(target,DEFAULT_VIEW_TEMPLATE,true);
		if (here!=target && document.getElementById(story.idPrefix+here))
			story.refreshTiddler(here,DEFAULT_VIEW_TEMPLATE,true);
	}
};
//}}}
The [[DOE|http://schools.nyc.gov/default.htm]] is the major provider of adult literacy and family literacy education services in New York City.

The University of the State of New York (USNY) is the most complete, interconnected system of educational services in the United States. USNY includes 7,000 public and private elementary and secondary schools; 248 colleges and universities; 251 for-profit schools; nearly 7,000 libraries; 750 museums; the State Archives, Library and Museum; vocational rehabilitation services for adults with disabilities; State schools for the blind and for the deaf; 25 public broadcasting facilities; and more than half a million licensed professionals.
[[An early mash up of hypertextual musings for assignment two]]
Patrizia Violi, in Electronic dialogue between orality and literacy. A semiotic approach (2000) talks about writing itself as a technology, as well as computers as a technology. In the  [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum]] (page 1) under 'English Aims' there is 
>'understand and use Standard Australian English in its spoken and written forms and in combination with other 'non-linguistic forms of communication'.
This from the start indicates the new curriculum will work toward integrating other forms of literacy. These other 'non-linguistic forms of communication bring in the [[multifocal]] and [[multimodal]] dimensions of literacy. Whether we are using a form of text-messaging or any one of the hundred different social medias available, or literay art such as [[picture poems|http://picasaweb.google.com/tneuage/PicturePoems#]], we will use non-linguistic forms to enhance our message or use the non-linguistic form to be the message.

[[The Melbourne Declaration]] proclaims its efforts to //'Promoting world-class curriculum and assessment'//...
>//'As a foundation for further learning and adult life the curriculum will include practical knowledge and skills development in areas such as ICT and design and technology, which are central to Australia’s skilled economy and provide crucial pathways to post-school success.'//
There is an ever growing mass of literature (Rheingold, 1985, 1991, 1993, 1994, 1999, 2000; Stubbs, 1996, 1998; Herring, 1994, 2002; Jones, 1995, 1997; Donath, 1998, 1999; Schiano, 1997) which addresses [[CMC]] techniques and compares them to other modes of communication. 
>Intent exists in all speech situations; what is different in a virtual space is that intent is more than usually opaque, and the anticipation of concealed or subversive intent is heightened by the lack of physical contact and non-linguistic cues. Are participants there to gather information, exchange information, or play performance games? ([[Neuage]], 2005).
Carrington and Robinson (2009), discuss using [[Flickr|http://www.flickr.com/]] as a 
>'communication tool especially using digital notes that can be superimposed on other's photos. Which provides a polysemic narrative about literacy and can promote discussion'. p.37.

Digital literacy has many forms. In an eighth grade class at Albany Academy for Girls I taught the program Flash (now Adobe Flash, when I was at AAG, it was Macromedia Flash). One of our projects was to create digital stories http://neuage.org/AA/web/FlashStory/FlashStory.htm In sixth grade at The Dwight School in New York City several years ago my students used short poems along with iTunes, Photoshop, InDesign and iMovie to create youtube videos, http://www.youtube.com/thedwightschool 

>>//@@Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Digital vs. Linear]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
The [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum]]  includes using forms such as emails, and websites and other forms of digital media along with letters andbooks as part of literacy.  Then new curriculum encourages students to listen to, view, read and create a wide range of literary and non-literary texts. This is very much a curriculum that seeks to integrate [[Digital Literacy]]. 

However, we need to be mindful of [[Digital Literacy]] so that [[hyperlink]]s and [[hypertext]]s are always a tool and not a result where a student can become lost in a[[multifocal]] environment and meaning becomes so disrupted that learning does not take place. 

>>//@@Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Educational Technology]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
Terrell Neuage
http://neuage.org
03/10/2010 
!Draft K-12 Common Core State Standards Available for Comment 
NGA Center, CCSSO Release First Official Public Draft 
 
>WASHINGTON—The National Governors Association Center for Best Practices (NGA Center) and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) today released the first official public draft of the K-12 standards as part of the Common Core State Standards Initiative, a process being led by governors and chief state school officers in 51 states, territories, and the District of Columbia. These draft standards, developed together with teachers, school administrators and experts, seek to provide a clear and consistent framework to prepare our children for college and the workforce.
[[online|http://www.nga.org/portal/site/nga/menuitem.6c9a8a9ebc6ae07eee28aca9501010a0/?vgnextoid=e50b863754047210VgnVCM1000005e00100aRCRD&vgnextchannel=759b8f2005361010VgnVCM1000001a01010aRCRD]]
 
Carrington and Robinson (2009) caution using gaming technology as a learning environment (pp 102 - 105). However, I have found using game construction highly educational. For example, I have had classes in grades 6 - 10 use applications such as [[MIT|http://www.mit.edu/]]'s [[Scratch|http://scratch.mit.edu/]] in English, Science, Math, Social Studies, Art and computer classes for the past four years. The same can be said with [[Second Life|http://secondlife.com/?v=1.1]], [[Google Sketchup|http://sketchup.google.com/#utm_campaign=en&utm_source=en-ha-na-us-google&utm_medium=ha&utm_term=google%20sketchup]], [[Adobe Flash|http://www.adobe.com/products/flash/]], [[Rhino 3D|http://www.rhino3d.com/]] (which I taught in grades 9 - 12 in three school over a five year period and many other applications.

Two years ago a Charter School in New York City started based on gaming with a grant from the [[Gates Foundation|http://www.gatesfoundation.org/Pages/home.aspx]]. (Salen, 2007).

Of course not all educational technology is based on games. There are many other factors to this. It is an ever changing field from the current iPad being introduced in high schools to using Facebook in Middle School or iPhones to create blogs to follow in story telling.

The [[Office of Educational Technology, New York City Department of Education|http://nycedtech.com/]] provides solutions to transform teaching, learning, and leading with real-word, standards-based, integration of technology throughout the curriculum using standardized services and customized support. A school's technology integrator has the role of not only knowing what children are using outside of school in a virtual environment but how what interests children can be incorporated within the school. This also means getting teachers onboard who may say they have too much to do already. The integration of technology within the classroom should be seamless and not be a jolt or big learning curve. Technology needs to blend within the classroom and not be used when not useful such as trying to write an essay using tiddlers. It is useful to be able to use [[hyperlink]]s and [[hypertext]]s but it should not be a burden as it has been for so many students in the CDU 411 unit. Valuable time is being wasted.

>//'The term educational technology is often associated with, and encompasses, instructional theory and learning theory. While instructional technology covers the processes and systems of learning and instruction, educational technology includes other systems used in the process of developing human capability. Educational Technology includes, but is not limited to, software, hardware, as well as Internet applications and activities. But there is still debate on what these terms mean.'// (Lowenthal, 2010)

>>@@//Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[What is writing? Computer vs. Hands]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
!!Elementary and Intermediate Grade Levels
*Standard 1 – Analysis, Inquiry, and Design
Students will use mathematical analysis, scientific inquiry, and engineering
design, as appropriate, to pose questions, seek answers, and develop solutions.
*Standard 2 – Information Systems
Students will access, generate, process, and transfer information using
appropriate technologies.
*Standard 5 – Technology
Students will apply technological knowledge and skills to design, construct, use,
and evaluate products and systems to satisfy human and environmental needs.
*Standard 6 – Interconnectedness – Common Themes
Students will understand the relationships and common themes that connect
mathematics, science, and technology and apply the themes to these and other
areas of learning.
*Standard 7 – Interdisciplinary Problem Solving
Students will apply the knowledge and thinking skills of mathematics, science,
and technology to address real-life problems and make informed decisions.
Basic information on how to 'install' and use TiddlyWiki is available at [[TiddlyWiki.com|http://www.tiddlywiki.com/]].
An incomplete [[Wiki]] on how to use TiddlyWiki is available at [[TiddlyWiki.org|http://tiddlywiki.org]].
A helpful [[Wiki]] for absolute beginners is [[Tiddler Toddler|http://tiddlertoddler.tiddlyspot.com/]].
A CheatSheet is available.
Why TiddlyWiki? See the [[Wikipedia|http://en.wikipedia.org]] entries on [[TiddlyWiki|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TiddlyWiki]] and [[Personal wikis|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_wiki]].

Otherwise, check out the [[Fix my tiddler|http://online.cdu.edu.au/webapps/blackboard/content/launchLink.jsp?course_id=_8870_1&content_id=_821176_1&mode=view]] forum on Learnline.
Digital literacy has many forms. In an eighth grade class at Albany Academy for Girls I taught the program Flash (now Adobe Flash, when I was at AAG, it was Macromedia Flash). One of our projects was to create digital stories http://neuage.org/AA/web/FlashStory/FlashStory.htm In sixth grade at The Dwight School in New York City several years ago my students used short poems along with iTunes, Photoshop, InDesign and iMovie to create youtube videos, http://www.youtube.com/thedwightschool 

see [[Flash Childrens Stories|http://neuage.org/AA/web/FlashStory/FlashStory.htm]]

Another digital artist writer, [[Raymond Kurzweil]], has created an online [[CyberArt's|http://www.kurzweilcyberart.com/]] program to create short [[hypertext]] poems in.
>Furthermore, I am not only looking at the question, //"How well are the current Australian national curriculum efforts integrating literacy, and in particular digital literacies?"// but what and how are we integrating [[digital literacy]] twenty years after the invention of the World Wide Web? It is easy to integrate technology, but the tools can quickly muddle the desired result. For example, are we using tiddlers because they are newish (less than four years old) and a seemingly interested tool to make links with or because it really fulfills the purpose of a wiki. Of course we know that a wiki is interactive but tiddlers saved locally are not. Having a link within an essay enhances the text but so do footnotes. Do we lose continuity by using hyperlinks? I wrote a thousand word poem during my Master's degree with every word a [[hyperlink]] - 1994, but after awhile the poem itself lost its meaning. Now I am part of a group  writing a [[mass poem|http://masspoem.neuage.org]] with hundreds of contributors in Facebook and the whole thing has a final edit by Freke Räihä, Sweden. It follows quite well, even though parts had to be translated from the many languages people contributed in. It is really good and follows reading in a linear format on Facebook. To have it linking all over the shop would have made it stupid.
@@>>Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Towards an Australian National Curriculum]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@
|Please read this table and fill in the mid section as you go|c
| ''Checklist'' |>|>|>| ''Your Take'' |>|>|>|bgcolor(#ffA500): ''Our Take'' |h
| Item | Done Well | Done | Struggled | Skipped |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done Well |bgcolor(#ffA500): Done |bgcolor(#ffA500): Struggled |bgcolor(#ffA500): Skipped |h
|The [[Personal Wiki]] displays the potential of [[The Medium]] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The responses are designed with [[Hypertext]] in mind | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The assignment makes use of the TiddlyWiki journal feature | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The tiddlers are properly tagged | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|MissingTiddlers are accounted for| [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|OrphanTiddlers are accounted for | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The assignment makes judicious use of the unit materials (textbooks, learning materials, readings) and the findings of private research (relevant curricula, domain-specific knowledge) | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|Technical terms are properly defined or exemplified | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|Information and ideas are correctly referenced | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
|The assignment is professionally presented | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] | [_] |
High Distinction
----
Distinction
----
Credit
----
Pass
----
Pass Conceded
----
Fail
!![[Great Expectations Learning Guides|http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/Great+Expectations.htm]]
>The Department of Education has developed guides for each grade, PK-8, entitled "Great Expectations, Partnering for your child's future," describing what children should know by the end of each school year.
Private schools are not under the public schools guidelines, however must private schools, including the one I am doing my practicum at follow the [Great Expectations Learning Guides|http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/Great+Expectations.htm]]

The guides are available in nine languages (English, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, Urdu, Bengali, Korean and Haitian Creole).
[[Designing High School Mathematics Courses Based on the Common Core Standards|http://www.corestandards.org/Files/K12MathAppendixA.pdf]]

//The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for Mathematics are organized by grade level in Grades K–8. At the high school level, the standards are organized by strand, showing a logical progression of content within those strands.//

I have been and will be using spreadsheets from grade three on. I have been using the application [[Scratch|http://scratch.mit.edu/]] from [[MIT|http://www.mit.edu/]] in grades 6 - 8 for the past four years and plan to continue using it as it teaches using variables as well as operators and coding.  [img[http://neuage.info/tiddler/tiddlerSucks.PNG]]
 
>A.REI.13 Solve equations f(x) = g(x) approximately by finding the intersections of the graphs of f(x) and g(x), e.g. using technology to graph the functions. Include cases where f(x) and/or g(x) are linear, polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions.
In this course, focus on linear, simple rational, quadratic, and exponential functions. Include the use of technology to approximate intersections.
[[Install the software]]:
<<tiddler [[Install the software]]>>

[[Tweak my browser]]:
<<tiddler [[Tweak my browser]]>>

[[Edit]]:
<<tiddler [[Edit]]>>

[[Save]]:
<<tiddler [[Save]]>>

[[Recover my work after a disaster]]:
<<tiddler [[Recover my work after a disaster]]>>

[[Find out more]]:
<<tiddler [[Find out more]]>>
The following paper by Mark Bernstein, a leading hypertext researcher, may help you to better appreciate some of the possibilities: [[Patterns of Hypertext|http://elvis.slis.indiana.edu/irpub/HT/1998/pdf3.pdf]].

This next page, authored perhaps by Lesley Smith of George Mason University, offers some advice on how to put together a hypertext university assignment: [[Writing Hypertext|http://osf1.gmu.edu/~lsmithg/writehtext.htm]].

For those of you wanting a 'bigger picture' view, you could try this article from the inventor of the terms [[Hypertext]] and [[Hypermedia]], Theodor Nelson (writing here with Robert Smith): [[Back to the Future: Hypertext the Way It Used To Be|http://xanadu.com/XanaduSpace/btf.htm]]. In this document, please take note of the concept of [[Transclusion]] (as opposed to 'inclusion').
You don't. This page is the software. The smarts are all inside the page source. Just save the file to a local folder when you download it from Learnline for the first time. //Exception//: Safari and Opera users will also need to put a Java helper applet in their local folder. See the [[Find out more]] entry below.
>It has been noted that the links between reading and writing, for example, have been emphasized to such an extent that it is now normal to see them referred to as “literacy” (Wray & Medwell, 1991, p. 3).
The Australian Curriculum draft version 1.0.1 for English integrates language, literature and literacy. I will comment briefly throughout this essay as a comparison the //[[Draft K-12 Common Core State Standards Available for Comment]]// being worked on now for the next school year in the USA beginning next September (Spring, USA)  to ascertain the linkage in creating new national curriculums. As societies are dependent on web communities from business to governments using [[social sites]]; Twitters, Facebook, and any of the other hundred online collaborations, are we as educators, providing our students with the tools to embrace future communities? Children are using any one of dozens of online communities at home but are we enhancing their educational experience with these? And more importantly is [[digital literacy]] being integrated within the Australian curriculum so we have educated people and not a generation that can rarely string together a properly formed sentence or have a focus discussion because they have lost the ability to negotiate in a linear direction any more?

A [[multifocal]] linking environment is a great tool but will we become lost in it, using our [[abbreviations]], [[emoticons]] and [[ASSICONS]]?
This forms a basis of my interrogation of the draft K–10 Australian Curriculum, and other ACARA documentation. 

I am researching how literacy, especially [[Digital Literacy]] is being integrated into Australian schools with a large Aboriginal population to gleam methods useable here in New York City with so many cultural backgrounds and in particular [[Native Americans]]. As part of the [[New York State Education Department's Virtual Learning System]] teachers of [[Native Americans]] are being prepared to integrate digital literacy into the curriculum as part of the [[Draft K-12 Common Core State Standards Available for Comment]].
@@>//Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Furthermore]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.//@@
![[Furthermore]]
/***
|Name|ListboxPlugin|
|Source|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#ListboxPlugin|
|Documentation|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#ListboxPluginInfo|
|Version|1.4.0|
|Author|Eric Shulman|
|License|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#LegalStatements|
|~CoreVersion|2.1|
|Type|plugin|
|Description|set custom field or tiddler tags by selecting from listbox/droplist|
The {{{<<select>>}}} macro allows you to set tiddler field values by selecting pre-configured values from a listbox/droplist control.  
!!!!!Documentation
>see [[ListboxPluginInfo]]
!!!!!Revisions
<<<
2009.09.02 [1.4.0] added 'prompt:...' param
|please see [[ListboxPluginInfo]] for additional revision details|
2007.05.12 [0.5.0] started
<<<
!!!!!Code
***/
//{{{
version.extensions.ListboxPlugin= {major: 1, minor: 4, revision: 0, date: new Date(2009,9,2)};

config.macros.select = {
	tooltip: "select a value for %0@%1",
	blankTooltip: "set %0@%1=[no value]",
	valueTooltip: "set %0@%1=%2",
	otherLabel: "other",
	otherTooltip: "set %0@%1=[enter a value...]",
	otherPrompt: "enter a value for '%0'",
	editLabel: "edit list...",
	editTooltip: "edit '%0' list definition (%1)",
	changeMsg: "setting %0@%1=%2",
	verbose: false,
	hereKeyword: "here",
	defaultTarget: "SiteFields",
	handler:
	function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {

		// default to containing tiddler or "SiteFields" catch-all
		var here=story.findContainingTiddler(place);
		var targetID=here?here.getAttribute("tiddler"):this.defaultTarget;

		// get field name and non-default target (if any)
		var field=params.shift();
		var pos=field.indexOf("@"); // if non-default target ("field@tiddler" syntax)
		if(pos!=-1) { // split field into field and tiddlername.
			if (field.substr(pos+1)!=this.hereKeyword) // "here" == use default target
				targetID=field.substr(pos+1); // use different target tiddler
			field=field.substr(0,pos);
		}
		if(!field || !field.length) return; // no field name... do nothing
		if (field.substr(0,1)=="=") targetID="(system)"; // internal option value

		var items=[]; var listsrc='';
		var autosave=false; var allowBlank=false; var allowOther=false; var allowEdit=false;
		var allowMultiple=false; var wikifyData=false; var rows=0; var width='';
		var p=params.shift();
		while (p) {
			if (p.toLowerCase()=='autosave')	// autosave on change
				autosave=true;
			else if (p.toLowerCase()=='allowblank')	// add empty item
				var allowBlank=true;
			else if (p.toLowerCase()=='allowother')	// add "other: ____" item
				var allowOther=true;
			else if (p.toLowerCase()=='allowedit')	// add "edit list..." item
				var allowEdit=true;
			else if (p.toLowerCase()=='allowmultiple') // multi-select
				var allowMultiple=true;
			else if (p.startsWith('rows:')) // 0=autosize listbox, 1=droplist, n=listbox
				var rows=p.substr(5);
			else if (p.startsWith('width:')) // CSS width of list
				var width=p.substr(6);
			else if (p.startsWith('prompt:')) // prompt text (1st item in list)
				var ptext=p.substr(7);
			else if (p.substr(0,1)=="+"||p.substr(0,1)=="*") { // read HR-separated tiddler
				var listsrc=p.substr(1);
				var listtxt=store.getTiddlerText(listsrc,'');
				var wikifyData=p.substr(0,1)=="*";
				if (listtxt.length && wikifyData) // wikify source to handle macros/scripts
					listtxt=this.getWikifiedData(listtxt);
				if (listtxt.length)
					items=items.concat(listtxt.split(listtxt.indexOf('\n----\n')!=-1?'\n----\n':'\n'));
			}
			else if (p.substr(0,1)=="=") { // get items from tagged tiddlers
				var tids=store.getTaggedTiddlers(p.substr(1));
				for (var t=0; t<tids.length; t++) items.push(tids[t].title);
			}
			else { // param is item value or 'label=value'
				var parts=p.split("=");
				var label=parts[0]; var v=parts[1]?parts[1]:parts[0];
				items.push(label+"="+v);
			}
			p=params.shift();
		}
		if (rows==1) allowMultiple=false; // droplist cannot do multi-select
		if (tiddler && !story.isDirty(tiddler.title)) autosave=true; // tiddler is in VIEW mode, force autosave

		this.render(createTiddlyElement(place,"span"), null,
			targetID, field, ptext, items, listsrc, wikifyData,
			rows, width, autosave, allowBlank, allowOther, allowEdit, allowMultiple);

		store.addNotification(null,this.refresh); // syncs lists when tiddlers are changed
	},
	getWikifiedData: // wikify tiddler content, then extract text WITH newlines and HRs included
	function(txt) {
		var e=createTiddlyElement(document.body,"div"); wikify(txt,e);
		var breaks=e.getElementsByTagName("br");
		for (var b=0; b<breaks.length; b++) breaks[b].parentNode.insertBefore(document.createTextNode("\n"),breaks[b]);
		var lines=e.getElementsByTagName("hr");
		for (var l=0; l<lines.length; l++) lines[l].parentNode.insertBefore(document.createTextNode("----\n"),lines[l]);
		var items=e.getElementsByTagName("li");
		for (var i=0; i<items.length; i++) items[i].parentNode.insertBefore(document.createTextNode("\n"),items[i]);
		var txt=getPlainText(e); removeNode(e); return txt;
	},
	refresh:
	function (title) { // re-render dependent lists
		var lists=document.getElementsByTagName('select');
		for (var i=0; i<lists.length; i++) { var list=lists[i];
			if (list.getAttribute('listsrc')!=title) continue; // no sync needed
			var listtxt=store.getTiddlerText(list.getAttribute('listsrc')||'','');
			if (listtxt.length && list.getAttribute("wikifyData")=="true")
				listtxt=this.getWikifiedData(listtxt);
			if (listtxt.length)
				var items=listtxt.split(listtxt.indexOf('\n----\n')!=-1?'\n----\n':'\n');
			config.macros.select.render(list.parentNode, list,
				list.getAttribute('tiddler'),
				list.getAttribute('edit'),
				list.getAttribute('ptext'),
				items||[],
				list.getAttribute('listsrc'),
				list.getAttribute("wikifyData")=="true",
				list.getAttribute("rows"),
				list.getAttribute("width"),
				list.getAttribute("autosave")=="true",
				list.getAttribute("allowBlank")=="true",
				list.getAttribute("allowOther")=="true",
				list.getAttribute("allowEdit")=="true",
				list.getAttribute("allowMultiple")=="true");
		}
	},
	render:
	function (place, here, targetID, field, ptext, items, listsrc, wikifyData,
		rows, width, autosave, allowBlank, allowOther, allowEdit, allowMultiple) {

		var values=[]; var opts=[];

		// use current selection(s) (if any) (except for "edit list..." item)
		if (here) for (var i=0; i<here.options.length; i++) {
			var opt=here.options[i];
			if (opt.selected && opt.text!=config.macros.select.editLabel) values.push(opt.value);
		}
		// no listbox or no selections... get value(s) from field (if any)
		if (!values.length) {
			var v=(field.substr(0,1)=='=')?config.options[field.substr(1)]:store.getValue(targetID,field);
			if (v) values=(field=='tags'||allowMultiple)?v.readBracketedList():[v];
		}
		// add prompt item
		if (ptext&&ptext.length)
			opts.push('<option value="_ptext" title="">'+ptext+'</option>');
		// add 'no value' item
		if ((!allowMultiple && !values.length) || allowBlank)
			opts.push('<option value="" title="'+this.blankTooltip.format([field,targetID])+'"></option>');
		// add enumerated items
		var isOther=values.length; // assume no matching value
		for (var opt=0; opt<items.length; opt++) {
			var lines=items[opt].split("\n"); var parts=lines[0].split("=");
			var label=parts[0];
			var v=parts[1]?parts[1]:parts[0];
			var title=lines[1]?lines[1]:this.valueTooltip.format([field,targetID,v]);
			var sel=values.contains(v); if (sel) isOther=false; // found matching value
			opts.push('<option value="'+v+'" '+(sel?'selected':'')+' title="'+title+'">'+label+'</option>');
		}
		// add 'other...'
		if (field=='tags') isOther=false;
		if (isOther||allowOther) {
			var label="other"+(isOther?(": "+values[0]):"...");
			var v=isOther?values[0]:'';
			var t=this.otherTooltip.format([field,targetID]);
			opts.push('<option value="'+v+'" '+(isOther?'selected':'')+' title="'+t+'">'+label+'</option>');
		}
		// add 'edit list...'
		if (listsrc && (!store.getTiddlerText(listsrc) || allowEdit)) {
			var title=this.editTooltip.format([field,listsrc]);
			opts.push('<option value="'+listsrc+'" title="'+title+'">'+this.editLabel+'</option>');
		}
		// render listbox
		var html='<select '+(values[0]?'value="'+values[0]+'" ':' ')
			+' title="'+this.tooltip.format([field,targetID])+'"'
			+' rows="'+rows+'"'+' size="'+(rows!=0?rows:opts.length)+'"'+' style="width:'+width+'"'
			+' tiddler="'+targetID+'"'+' edit="'+field+'"'+' ptext="'+ptext+'"'
			+' listsrc="'+listsrc+'"'+' wikifyData="'+wikifyData+'"'
			+' autosave="'+autosave+'"'+' allowBlank="'+allowBlank+'"'+' allowOther="'+allowOther+'"'
			+' allowEdit="'+allowEdit+'"'+' allowMultiple="'+allowMultiple+'"'+(allowMultiple?' multiple':'')
			+' onclick="return config.macros.select.onClick(this,event)"'
			+' onchange="return config.macros.select.onChange(this,event)"'
			+' ondblclick="return false">'+opts.join('')+'</select>';
		place.innerHTML=html;
	},
	onClick:
	function(here,event) {
		var sel=here.selectedIndex;
		if (sel!=-1 && here.options[sel].text.startsWith(config.macros.select.otherLabel))
			here.onchange.apply(here,arguments);
	},
	onChange:
	function(here,event) {
		var cms=config.macros.select; // abbrev
		var sel=here.selectedIndex;
		if (sel!=-1) {
			if (here.options[sel].text==cms.editLabel) {
				story.displayTiddler(story.findContainingTiddler(here),here.value,DEFAULT_EDIT_TEMPLATE);
				return false;
			}
			if (here.options[sel].text.startsWith(cms.otherLabel)) {
				var newval=prompt(cms.otherPrompt.format([here.getAttribute("edit")]),here.value);
				if (!newval) {// user cancelled
					var v=store.getValue(here.getAttribute("tiddler"),here.getAttribute("edit"));
					{ here.value=v; if (v==undefined) here.selectedIndex=0; return false; }
				};
				here.options[sel].value=newval;
				here.options[sel].text=cms.otherLabel+": "+newval;
				here.value=newval;
			}
			if (here.options[sel].value=='_ptext')
				for (var i=0; i<here.options.length; i++)
					here.options[i].selected=false;
		}
		if (here.getAttribute("autosave")=="true") config.macros.select.setFieldValue(here);
		return false;
	},
	setFieldValue: function(here) {
		var tid=here.getAttribute("tiddler"); if (!tid || !tid.length) return; // no target, do nothing
		var field=here.getAttribute("edit");
		if (field.substr(0,1)=='=') { // option cookie instead of tiddler field
			config.macros.option.propagateOption(field.substr(1),"value",here.value,"input");
			return;
		}
		// ensure tiddler exists
		if (!store.tiddlerExists(tid)) store.saveTiddler(tid,tid,"",config.options.txtUserName,new Date(),[]);
		if (field=='tags') {
			store.suspendNotifications();
			for (var i=0; i<here.options.length; i++) {
				var opt=here.options[i];
				if (opt.text==config.macros.select.editLabel) continue;
				store.setTiddlerTag(tid,opt.selected,opt.value);
			}
			store.resumeNotifications();
		} else {
			// get multi-select items
			var values=[];
			for (var i=0; i<here.options.length; i++) {
				var opt=here.options[i];
				if (opt.text==config.macros.select.editLabel) continue;
				if (opt.selected) values.pushUnique(String.encodeTiddlyLink(opt.value));
			}
			if (values.length==1) values=[here.value]; // remove unneeded brackets around single value
			store.setValue(tid,field,values.length?values.join(' '):null); // if no selections, delete field
		}
		// 'touch' tiddler and report to user
		var t=store.getTiddler(tid);
		var who=config.options.chkForceMinorUpdate?t.modifier:config.options.txtUserName;
		var when=config.options.chkForceMinorUpdate?t.modified:new Date();
		store.saveTiddler(tid,tid,t.body,who,when,t.tags,t.fields);
		if (config.macros.select.verbose)
			{ clearMessage(); displayMessage(config.macros.select.changeMsg.format([field,tid,here.value])); }
	}
}
//}}}
[[Question 1]]
[[Question 2]]
[[Question 3]]

[[MyJournal includes Activity 2.1 - 2.10]]

[[MyGlossary]]

[[References]]

[[Marker'sComments]]

[[Personal Tiddler]]



^^TiddlyWiki <<version>>
Marc Seifer Professor of psychology at Roger Williams University, Rhode Island, USA and avid writer ([[From Freud to Gurdjieff|http://www.marcseifer.com/inward.htm]] and the acclaimed //[[Wizard: The Life & Times of Nicola Tesla|http://www.amazon.com/Wizard-Nikola-Biography-Genius-Citadel/dp/0806519606/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274892561&sr=1-1]]//, (his newer work, 2009) //[[Transcending the speed of Light: Consciousness, Quantum Physics, and the Fifth Dimension|http://www.amazon.com/Transcending-Speed-Light-Consciousness-Dimension/dp/1594772290/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274892561&sr=1-3]]//, His well known //[[The Definitive Book of Handwriting Analysis: The Complete Guide to Interpreting Personalities, Detecting Forgeries, and Revealing Brain Activity Through the Science of Graphology|http://www.amazon.com/Definitive-Book-Handwriting-Analysis-Personalities/dp/1601630255/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274892561&sr=1-2]]//, as well as several other novels. Marc is currently working on a book about my brother. I was fortunate to recently spend a weekend discussing literary topics with him at his home in Rhode Island. I include his work in [[What is writing? Computer vs. Hands]].
|Submission|c
| Item | Done? |h
|Submitted through [[Learnline|http://online.cdu.edu.au]] | [X] |
|Submitted on time | [_] |
|Respects the SubmissionGuidelines | [_] |
|Preserves the integrity of the "Assignment 2" TiddlyWiki | [_] |

|AssessmentCriteria|c
| Action | List | Marked? |h
| Click the links<br>to access<br>the full criteria |<<tiddler AssessmentCriteria>>| [_] |

|Grade|c
|bgcolor(#ffA500):Overall grade |<<select grading1 rows:1 "prompt:grade" +Grades>> | Grade recorded? | [_] |
Dear <<tiddler SiteSubtitle>>,

<<tiddler Marker'sCommentsDetail>>

Specific feedback is available in the [[Marker'sChecklist]].

[img[CDU logo|http://www.cdu.edu.au/imageshp/cdu-logo-footer.gif][http://www.cdu.edu.au]]
----
''Marking use only'': markers [[click here|Marker'sWorkshop]].
----
/%Replace EVERYTHING in this box with your real comments%///Simulation only//:
Reading MyResponses, it is evident that ...
Top tiddlers with most links going out from:
<<cloud links action:goto limit:20 -NoiseTiddlers>>
Top tiddlers with most links going in to:
<<cloud references action:goto limit:20 -NoiseTiddlers>>
Frequently used tags:
<<cloud -NoiseTags>>
[[Marker'sSecretWeapon]]: <<tiddler Marker'sSecretWeapon>>
<<search multiliteracies>>
| Task | Done? |h
|Set the 'signing your edits' box: <<option txtUserName>> | [ ] |
|Check the submission using [[Marker'sData]] | [ ] |
|Complete the [[Marker'sChecklist]] | [ ] |
|Add some comments to [[Marker'sCommentsDetail]] | [ ] |
|>| <<saveChanges "One last 'save'" Phew!>> |
/***
|Name|MatchTagsPlugin|
|Source|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#MatchTagsPlugin|
|Documentation|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#MatchTagsPluginInfo|
|Version|2.0.1|
|Author|Eric Shulman|
|License|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#LegalStatements|
|~CoreVersion|2.1|
|Type|plugin|
|Description|'tag matching' with full boolean expressions (AND, OR, NOT, and nested parentheses)|
!!!!!Documentation
> see ~MatchTagsPluginInfo
!!!!!Revisions
<<<
2009.08.29 [2.0.1] added support for {{{config.macros.matchTags.defTags}}} to auto-tag ~MatchingTiddlers output
| please see ~MatchTagsPluginInfo for additional revision details |
2008.02.28 [1.0.0] initial release
<<<
!!!!!Code
***/
//{{{
version.extensions.MatchTagsPlugin= {major: 2, minor: 0, revision: 1, date: new Date(2009,8,29)};

// store.getMatchingTiddlers() processes boolean expressions for tag matching
//    sortfield (optional) sets sort order for tiddlers - default=title
//    tiddlers (optional) use alternative set of tiddlers (instead of current store)
TiddlyWiki.prototype.getMatchingTiddlers = function(tagexpr,sortfield,tiddlers) {

	var debug=config.options.chkDebug; // abbreviation
	var cmm=config.macros.matchTags; // abbreviation
	var r=[]; // results are an array of tiddlers
	var tids=tiddlers||store.getTiddlers(sortfield||"title");
	if (tiddlers && sortfield) store.sortTiddlers(tids,sortfield);
	if (debug) displayMessage(cmm.msg1.format([tids.length]));

	// try simple lookup to quickly find single tags or tags that
	// contain boolean operators as literals, e.g. "foo and bar"
	for (var t=0; t<tids.length; t++)
		if (tids[t].isTagged(tagexpr)) r.pushUnique(tids[t]);
	if (r.length) {
		if (debug) displayMessage(cmm.msg4.format([r.length,tagexpr]));
		return r;
	}
	
	// convert expression into javascript code with regexp tests,
	// so that "tag1 AND ( tag2 OR NOT tag3 )" becomes
	// "/\~tag1\~/.test(...) && ( /\~tag2\~/.test(...) || ! /\~tag3\~/.test(...) )"

	// normalize whitespace, tokenize operators, delimit with "~"
	var c=tagexpr.trim(); // remove leading/trailing spaces
	c = c.replace(/\s+/ig," "); // reduce multiple spaces to single spaces
	c = c.replace(/\(\s?/ig,"~(~"); // open parens
	c = c.replace(/\s?\)/ig,"~)~"); // close parens
	c = c.replace(/(\s|~)?&&(\s|~)?/ig,"~&&~"); // &&
	c = c.replace(/(\s|~)AND(\s|~)/ig,"~&&~"); // AND
	c = c.replace(/(\s|~)?\|\|(\s|~)?/ig,"~||~"); // ||
	c = c.replace(/(\s|~)OR(\s|~)/ig,"~||~"); // OR
	c = c.replace(/(\s|~)?!(\s|~)?/ig,"~!~"); // !
	c = c.replace(/(^|~|\s)NOT(\s|~)/ig,"~!~"); // NOT
	c = c.replace(/(^|~|\s)NOT~\(/ig,"~!~("); // NOT(
	// change tag terms to regexp tests
	var terms=c.split("~"); for (var i=0; i<terms.length; i++) { var t=terms[i];
		if (/(&&)|(\|\|)|[!\(\)]/.test(t) || t=="") continue; // skip operators/parens/spaces
		if (t==config.macros.matchTags.untaggedKeyword)
			terms[i]="tiddlertags=='~~'"; // 'untagged' tiddlers
		else
			terms[i]="/\\~"+t+"\\~/.test(tiddlertags)";
	}
	c=terms.join(" ");
	if (debug) { displayMessage(cmm.msg2.format([tagexpr])); displayMessage(cmm.msg3.format([c])); }

	// scan tiddlers for matches
	for (var t=0; t<tids.length; t++) {
	 	// assemble tags from tiddler into string "~tag1~tag2~tag3~"
		var tiddlertags = "~"+tids[t].tags.join("~")+"~";
		try { if(eval(c)) r.push(tids[t]); } // test tags
		catch(e) { // error in test
			displayMessage(cmm.msg2.format([tagexpr]));
			displayMessage(cmm.msg3.format([c]));
			displayMessage(e.toString());
			break; // skip remaining tiddlers
		}
	}
	if (debug) displayMessage(cmm.msg4.format([r.length,tagexpr]));
	return r;
}
//}}}
//{{{
config.macros.matchTags = {
	msg1: "scanning %0 input tiddlers",
	msg2: "looking for '%0'",
	msg3: "using expression: '%0'",
	msg4: "found %0 tiddlers matching '%1'",
	noMatch: "no matching tiddlers",
	untaggedKeyword: "-",
	untaggedLabel: "no tags",
	untaggedPrompt: "show tiddlers with no tags",
	defTiddler: "MatchingTiddlers",
	defTags: "",
	defFormat: "%0",
	defSeparator: "\n",
	reportHeading: "Found %0 tiddlers tagged with: '{{{%1}}}'\n----\n",
	handler: function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
		var mode=params[0]?params[0].toLowerCase():'';
		if (mode=="inline")
			params.shift();
		if (mode=="report" || mode=="panel") {
			params.shift();
			var target=params.shift()||this.defTiddler;
		}
		if (mode=="popup") {
			params.shift();
			if (params[0]&&params[0].substr(0,6)=="label:") var label=params.shift().substr(6);
			if (params[0]&&params[0].substr(0,7)=="prompt:") var prompt=params.shift().substr(7);
		} else {
			var fmt=(params.shift()||this.defFormat).unescapeLineBreaks();
			var sep=(params.shift()||this.defSeparator).unescapeLineBreaks();
		}
		var sortBy="+title";
		if (params[0]&&params[0].substr(0,5)=="sort:") sortBy=params.shift().substr(5);
		var expr = params.join(" ");
		if (mode!="panel" && (!expr||!expr.trim().length)) return;
		if (expr==this.untaggedKeyword)
			{ var label=this.untaggedLabel; var prompt=this.untaggedPrompt };
		switch (mode) {
			case "popup": this.createPopup(place,label,expr,prompt,sortBy); break;
			case "panel": this.createPanel(place,expr,fmt,sep,sortBy,target); break;
			case "report": this.createReport(target,this.defTags,expr,fmt,sep,sortBy); break;
			case "inline": default: this.createInline(place,expr,fmt,sep,sortBy); break;
		}
	},
	formatList: function(tids,fmt,sep) {
		var out=[];
		for (var t=0; t<tids.length; t++) {
			var title="[["+tids[t].title+"]]";
			var who=tids[t].modifier;
			var when=tids[t].modified.toLocaleString();
			var text=tids[t].text;
			var first=tids[t].text.split("\n")[0];
			var desc=store.getTiddlerSlice(tids[t].title,"description");
			desc=desc||store.getTiddlerSlice(tids[t].title,"Description");
			desc=desc||store.getTiddlerText(tids[t].title+"##description");
			desc=desc||store.getTiddlerText(tids[t].title+"##Description");
			out.push(fmt.format([title,who,when,text,first,desc]));
		}
		return out.join(sep);
	},
	createInline: function(place,expr,fmt,sep,sortBy) {
		wikify(this.formatList(store.sortTiddlers(store.getMatchingTiddlers(expr),sortBy),fmt,sep),place);
	},
	createPopup: function(place,label,expr,prompt,sortBy) {
		var btn=createTiddlyButton(place,
			(label||expr).format([expr]),
			(prompt||config.views.wikified.tag.tooltip).format([expr]),
			function(ev){ return config.macros.matchTags.showPopup(this,ev||window.event); });
		btn.setAttribute("sortBy",sortBy);
		btn.setAttribute("expr",expr);
	},
	showPopup: function(here,ev) {
		var p=Popup.create(here); if (!p) return false;
		var tids=store.getMatchingTiddlers(here.getAttribute("expr"));
		store.sortTiddlers(tids,here.getAttribute("sortBy"));
		var list=[]; for (var t=0; t<tids.length; t++) list.push(tids[t].title);
		if (!list.length) createTiddlyText(p,this.noMatch);
		else {
			var b=createTiddlyButton(createTiddlyElement(p,"li"),
				config.views.wikified.tag.openAllText,
				config.views.wikified.tag.openAllTooltip,
				function() {
					var list=this.getAttribute("list").readBracketedList();
					story.displayTiddlers(null,tids);
				});
			b.setAttribute("list","[["+list.join("]] [[")+"]]");
			createTiddlyElement(p,"hr");
		}
		var out=this.formatList(tids," &nbsp;%0&nbsp; ","\n"); wikify(out,p);
		Popup.show();
		ev.cancelBubble=true;
		if(ev.stopPropagation) ev.stopPropagation();
		return false;
	},
	createReport: function(target,tags,expr,fmt,sep,sortBy) {
		var tids=store.sortTiddlers(store.getMatchingTiddlers(expr),sortBy);
		if (!tids.length) { displayMessage('no matches for: '+expr); return false; }
		var msg=config.messages.overwriteWarning.format([target]);
		if (store.tiddlerExists(target) && !confirm(msg)) return false;
		var out=this.reportHeading.format([tids.length,expr])
		out+=this.formatList(tids,fmt,sep);
		store.saveTiddler(target,target,out,config.options.txtUserName,new Date(),tags,{});
		story.closeTiddler(target); story.displayTiddler(null,target);
	},
	createPanel: function(place,expr,fmt,sep,sortBy,tid) {
		var s=createTiddlyElement(place,"span"); s.innerHTML=store.getTiddlerText("MatchTagsPlugin##html");
		var f=s.getElementsByTagName("form")[0];
		f.expr.value=expr; f.fmt.value=fmt; f.sep.value=sep.escapeLineBreaks();
		f.tid.value=tid; f.tags.value=this.defTags;
	}
};
//}}}
/***
//{{{
!html
<form style='display:inline;white-space:nowrap'>
<input type='text'    name='expr' style='width:50%' title='tag expression'><!--
--><input type='text'    name='fmt'  style='width:10%' title='list item format'><!--
--><input type='text'    name='sep'  style='width:5%'  title='list item separator'><!--
--><input type='text'    name='tid'  style='width:12%' title='target tiddler title'><!--
--><input type='text'    name='tags' style='width:10%' title='target tiddler tags'><!--
--><input type='button'  name='go'   style='width:8%'  value='go' onclick="
	var expr=this.form.expr.value;
	if (!expr.length) { alert('Enter a boolean tag expression'); return false; }
	var fmt=this.form.fmt.value;
	if (!fmt.length) { alert('Enter the list item output format'); return false; }
	var sep=this.form.sep.value.unescapeLineBreaks();
	var tid=this.form.tid.value;
	if (!tid.length) { alert('Enter a target tiddler title'); return false; }
	var tags=this.form.tags.value;
	config.macros.matchTags.createReport(tid,tags,expr,fmt,sep,'title');
	return false;">
</form>
!end
//}}}
***/
//{{{
// SHADOW TIDDLER for displaying default panel input form
config.shadowTiddlers.MatchTags="<<matchTags panel>>";
//}}}
//{{{
// TWEAK core filterTiddlers() for enhanced boolean matching in [tag[...]] syntax:
// use getMatchingTiddlers instead getTaggedTiddlers
var fn=TiddlyWiki.prototype.filterTiddlers;
fn=fn.toString().replace(/getTaggedTiddlers/g,"getMatchingTiddlers");
eval("TiddlyWiki.prototype.filterTiddlers="+fn);
//}}}
//{{{
// REDEFINE core handler for enhanced boolean matching in tag:"..." paramifier
// use filterTiddlers() instead of getTaggedTiddlers() to get list of tiddlers.
config.paramifiers.tag = {
	onstart: function(v) {
		var tagged = store.filterTiddlers("[tag["+v+"]]");
		story.displayTiddlers(null,tagged,null,false,null);
	}
};
//}}}
A term introduced by the [[New London Group]] ...
I did a critical reading of this article to be able to compare how Waterman's research fits in with the new Australian Curriculum and how I have seen technology in the classroom in my teaching experience over the past decade. I summarized this article and did a comparison with other research (see MyGlossary).

I am using the simple-argument perspective (Metcalfe, 2007), drawing on the 'argument as inquiry' perspective. Waterman starts his argument that it is not enough to hand out lap tops to students from 9th to 12 grade with out adequate support.

Waterman in his article “Lead the revolution” (2009) challenges the notion that it is enough to hand out lap tops to students from 9th to 12 grade and without support, with inadequate planning, to expect there to be a digital revolution! 

I taught at Albany Academy for Girls (Albany, New York) from 2002 - 2005. At AAG girls were given Mac laptops starting in grade 5. Across the street at the Boys Academy they were not. It was interesting teaching high school computing to discover that the girls were more advanced than the boys due to being given computers. The reasoning was that the boys would just do it at home and the girls needed the extra help.

Though some people are already offering ‘good digital education’, he says, the remainder of us have tried to  enlist the untapped resource, the students themselves. What the students have, that the majority of us do not have, is no fear, though they typically have less knowledge than we do.  

He poses the question, how then do we ‘establish digital literacy and make our students into successful digital citizens’? (p8). 

This is important to consider with the new Australian Curriculum presenting a curriculum yet leaving it to the teachers to implement it. With AAG laptops were a part of the classroom, there was not a computer class offered until high school. The computers were no different than taking notes in a notebook.

The skills he proposes are transferable across curriculum. The first of these is developing good research skills, which involve managing information and being discriminating of resources; which is much more than ‘googling’. Google however does offer an ‘astonishing resource’, but with training in the language of search, in the use of quotation marks and other tools, can be much better used. He points to useful other websites such as www.wolframalpha.com.  

Waterman discusses learning together with the students; such things as recognizing [[spam]] emails, protecting your on-line identity, and how what we post online can affect our lives, teaching the students digital etiquette,  and differentiating the different styles of online communication. He also discusses the value of discussions about cyber-bullying with students. 

Other aspects of successful use of computers are also covered and Waterman stresses the importance of students taking responsibility for such things as  organizing chargers, access to powerpoints, keeping the computer from being stolen and from physical damage, and backing up files. He discusses the time saving value of RSS, which brings information to you as it becomes available.  

The presentation of student’s work can reach a new quality as they learn to use such things as VoiceThread, Photo Story and Comic Life. There are also many options for creative students who are encouraged to have free reign. He talks about encouraging students to use their mobile phone technologies as well. 

Waterman makes the final point that it’s sometimes worth allowing the students to take the lead in these things. None of us has the time or the capacity that the collective of our classrooms have. He presents a challenge to teachers ‘it’s not about relinquishing control; its harnessing the abilities available to you’ (p.10)

Waterman has taken a good introductory look at computers in the classroom but there is so much further to go such as using [[social sites]], blogs, virtual worlds and youtube as an extension of the classroom
Most of us in here relate our early reading experiences. What would be interesting is how our sociocultural model of reading has changed in the past decade with the advent of hypertext and social sites. I was teaching speech classes at State University of New York in the beginning of 2005 when one of my students gave her speech on a new way to keep in touch with other college students that she learned about from friends at Harvard (a couple of hours East of us) called Facebook. I got my first account then and have been amazed how it has changed the landscape of literacy amongst all ages. At the time, five years ago, it was college students. A few years later I was teaching in high school and those students were using it and then in middle school two years ago we began using it with students, setting up Facebook pages for famous Revolutionary War people in social studies. This is all progressing from the early days of html in 1990 when we made webpages and hyperlinked to one another. I did a PhD on this multimodal literacy, http://neuage.org/thesis.htm at UNISA and a Masters at Deakin on the “Internet and Literature” in 1995. 

This sociocultural model is important in the new national curriculum work. The four reading practices discussed, I would think – not being a 'true-blue local' though still an Australian as far as a duel citizen – a Yank and an Aussie – is concerned, that theses reading practices will integrate us with Dreamtime Stories, Immigrant Stories (I am one if one can count an American as an immigrant), Nationalistic stories, and all the meanings we try to share both in our reading and sharing – think Facebook – and how we are finding new ways to read. I am currently doing research with a colleague in the UK at the University of Leicester on how people extend lives of their loved ones online. For example using games such as Farmville to extend deceased relative's lives by having them as neighbours, and having guestbooks and websites for friends and family who have died and the celebrity sites that are set up when one dies. “Readers activate text user practices when they use the text in social situations to achieve social purposes” is true
<<tagging gloss>>
>My Journal is a combination of [[notes on creating this assignment]] in a tiddler and the assigned activites below: Activity 2.1 - 2.10
# [[27 May 2010]] Job application 
# [[26 May 2010]] Transferred across into text-based online behaviours
# [[24 May 2010]] [[Marc Seifer]] ~ [[transnational identities]] ~ [[multifocal]]
# [[25 May 2010]] Electronic communication has been important to globalisation and the rise of modern society
# [[21 May 2010]] United States creating a [['Draft k-12 Common Core State Standards Available for Comment|http://www.nga.org/portal/site/nga/menuitem.6c9a8a9ebc6ae07eee28aca9501010a0/?vgnextoid=e50b863754047210VgnVCM1000005e00100aRCRD&vgnextchannel=759b8f2005361010VgnVCM1000001a01010aRCRD]]

# [[Activity 2.1]]
# [[Activity 2.2]]
# [[Activity 2.3]]
# [[Activity 2.4]]
# [[Activity 2.5]]
# [[Activity 2.6]]
# [[Activity 2.7]]
# [[Activity 2.8]]
# [[Activity 2.9]]
This is the launch pad for your creative efforts. Think [[Hypertext]].

To get started you'll need to [[Edit]] this tiddler.

<<toolbar references>>
!//National School Standards, at Last// 
> Published: March 13, 2010 New York Times. Editorial
>>The countries that have left the United States behind in math and science education have one thing in common: They offer the same high education standards — often the same curriculum — from one end of the nation to the other. The United States relies on a generally mediocre patchwork of standards that vary, not just from state to state, but often from district to district. A child’s education depends primarily on ZIP code.
>That could eventually change if the states adopt the new rigorous standards proposed last week by the National Governors Association and a group representing state school superintendents. The proposal lays out clear, ambitious goals for what children should learn year to year and could change curriculums, tests and teacher training.
>>The standards, based on intensive research, reflect what students must know to succeed at college and to find good jobs in the 21st century. They are internationally benchmarked, which means that they emulate the expectations of high-performing school systems abroad. 
>This is not a call for a national curriculum. Rather, the proposed standards set out the skills that children should learn from kindergarten through high school. The proposals are writing-intensive and vertically aligned, building in complexity each year. The goal is to develop strong reasoning skills earlier than is now customary. 
>.By fifth grade, for example, students would be required to write essays in which they introduce, support and defend opinions, using specific facts and details. And by 12th grade, students would be expected to solve problems or answer questions by conducting focused research projects — and display skills generally associated today with the first year of college.
>>The quest for stronger, more coherent standards dates back to the iconic “Nation at Risk” report of 1983, which warned that “a rising tide of mediocrity” was jeopardizing the country’s future. The problem of weak standards became vividly apparent after Congress passed the No Child Left Behind Act of 2002, which required the states to document student progress with annual tests in exchange for federal aid.
>Most states that reported stronger performance on their own weak tests did far worse on the more the rigorous federal test. This showed that American children were performing far more poorly in reading and math than state education officials wanted the public to know.
>>As recently as the early 1990s, national standards were viewed with suspicion in much of the country. Attitudes began to change as governors saw that poor schooling had crippled a significant part of the work force, turned state colleges into remedial institutions and disadvantaged the states in the global market.
>The proposed standards were developed in a collaboration among 48 states and the District of Columbia, suggesting that national opinion, once bitterly divided on this question, has begun to coalesce. 
>>But it will take more than new standards to rebuild the schools. The same states and organizations that cooperated on the standards need to cooperate on a new and innovative curriculum. The notoriously troubled colleges of education need to prepare teachers who can teach the skills students will need. And sophisticated tests must be created so that we can measure results.
>The new standards provide an excellent starting point for the task of remaking public schooling in the United States. 
As part of the [[New York State Education Department's Virtual Learning System]] teachers of Native Americans are being prepared to integrate digital literacy into the curriculum as part of the [[Draft K-12 Common Core State Standards Available for Comment]].
>'Native Americans in New York State: Continuing Legacies is a new workshop offered by the New York State Museum and the Greater Capital Region Teacher Center to be held Thursday July 29 and Friday July 30, 2010. 8:30AM – 5:00PM.  Designed for middle and high school social studies teachers, the workshop features the cultural and historical legacies of Native Americans associated with New York State, and their contemporary life-ways. Participants will investigate issues of cultural continuity, change, and diversity and will use ethnological and archaeological artifacts, contemporary Native art, primary source documents, videos, maps, and bibliographic resources. Teachers will have access to collections of original materials now held by the State Museum, the State Library, and the State Archives, all programs of the Office of Cultural Education, in the State Education Department. The State Learning Standards addressed in the workshop are: Social Studies #1.3 & #1.4 (NY State History); #3.2 (Geography); #4.1 (Economics); and #5.1 (Govt.); English Language Arts #1, #3, & #4; Math #3.5; and Science #4.7   For more information please go to: http://www.nysm.nysed.gov/education/teacher/workshops.html '
Terrell Neuage 
home page http://neuage.org
>//The purpose of the New York State Education Department's Virtual Learning System is to encourage the use of the Internet as a tool for teaching and learning and to assist classroom teachers in locating Internet resources for instruction. VLS offers the full text of New York State's learning standards with their key ideas and performance indicators, as well as alternate performance indicators for students with severe disabilities. It provides resources that classroom teachers can use to support preK-12 standards-based instruction, such as sample tasks, learning experiences and lesson plans. //
[[New York State Information Technology Policy|http://www.oft.state.ny.us/policy/nys-p08-005.pdf]]
Effective Date: 05/17/2010

[[NEW YORK STATE BOARD OF REGENTS STATEWIDE LEARNING TECHNOLOGY PLAN|http://www.regents.nysed.gov/meetings/2010Meetings/February2010/0210bra3.pdf]]
In [[VISION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING]] what will be the guiding principles to advance New York in technology is that //All New York State learners will develop technological literacy to enter college//. By making state-wide standards New Yorkers will be able to integrate technology into the curriculum.

The University of the State of New York (USNY) is the most complete, interconnected system of educational services in the United States. USNY includes 7,000 public and private elementary and secondary schools; 248 colleges and universities; 251 for-profit schools; nearly 7,000 libraries; 750 museums; the State Archives, Library and Museum; vocational rehabilitation services for adults with disabilities; State schools for the blind and for the deaf; 25 public broadcasting facilities; and more than half a million licensed professionals.
[[NYSED Technology Education Home Page!}|http://eservices.nysed.gov/vls/subjectAreaHome.do?standardAreaID=6&contentID=13]]
The Statewide Learning Technology Plan was approved by the Board of Regents at the February 2010 meeting.
[[New York State Information Technology Policy]]
[[standard 1]] Analysis, Inquiry, and Design
[[standard 2]] Information Systems
[[standard 5]] Technology
[[standard 6]] Interconnectedness – Common Themes
[[standard 7]] Interdisciplinary Problem Solving

[[Elementary and Intermediate Grade Levels]]
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home page http://neuage.org
Online Discourse Analysis Method
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My sandbox to learn how to use Tiddler - this is not connected anyway to CDU but is only the views and pleasures and experiments of Dr. Terrell Neuage - http://neuage.tiddlyspot.com/ living on line in the post-realistic world.
[[PhD thesis|http://neuage.org/thesis.htm]] = 'Conversational analysis of chatroom talk' online at http://neuage.org/thesis.htm
[[Image below|http://neuage.org/ODAM.htm]] (C)Terrell Neuage 2002
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"Conversational analysis of Chatroom Talk" completed 2005 University of South Australia online at http://neuage.org/thesis.htm
How well are the current Australian national curriculum efforts integrating literacy, and in particular digital literacies?  

>Reference to the [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum|http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home]], and other [[ACARA documentation|http://www.acara.edu.au/news_media/publications.html]]. 

To follow a sem-linear format of tiddles go to [[notes on creating this assignment]]
Read and critique Chris Waterman's recent article in //Teacher Magazine// entitled [[Lead the Revolution|http://search.informit.com.au.ezproxy.cdu.edu.au/fullText;res=AEIPT;dn=177697]].
[[My Response]]
!!Describe some of the specific literacy requirements applying to your intended level of schooling (or subject area). How are you going to teach to them?

As I have taught in New York City schools for the past several years and I am doing my practicum in a NYC school as well as applying tomorrow to be the Directory of Technology Education at a prestigious school in Lower Manhattan my concentration for Question Three will based on the [[New York State Technology Standards]]. Currently I am doing my practicum in the fourth and the sixth grade and I will cover what I am doing in those grades. I have taught all grades K – 12 as a computer teacher, technology integrator, and as director of technology for two large schools. [[Question 3]] will therefore be a mixture of past efforts as well as what I plan to do beginning next school year (September).

Technology education is an integral program of study in New York City. The [[New York State Technology Standards]] along with the [[New York State Information Technology Policy]] are
 within the New York State mathematics, science, and technology (MST) Learning Standards. In [[High School Mathematics Courses Based on the Common Core Standards]]  which provides a  unifying standard using computer technology encouraging the //use and interpret quantities and units correctly in graphs and data displays (function graphs, data tables, scatter plots, and other visual displays of quantitative information)//. Students will need to generate graphs and data displays using technology. This standard should be considered whenever a graph or data display is discussed.

I will use one of the five [[New York State Technology Standards]] ~ [[standard 2]] to answer question 3's  'How are you going to teach to them?'

More on how I will teach and have taught and if get the position as Director Of Technology Education at a school in Lower Manhattan is discussed in [[New York State Technology Standards]].
Making a short hypertext poem in [[Kurzweil CyberArt's|http://www.kurzweilcyberart.com/]] program.
[[Kurzweil|http://www.kurzweilai.net/index.html?flash=1]], the only digital newsletter I have read everyday  for the past four years. He is one of the few humans worth listening to. How the digital universe will affect us, what happens when [[The Singularity|http://www.singularity.com/]] (also the title of his greatest book and should be a must read for everyone developing a national curriculum - oh wait, isn't this what Australia is doing?), the future of humans and how to educate the next generation is all within Kurzwiel's grasp. 
>…when reading on screen, the contemporary reader returns somewhat to the posture of the reader of Antiquity. The difference is that he reads a scroll which generally runs vertically and which is endowed with the characteristics inherent to the form of the book since the first centuries of the Christian era: pagination, index, tables, etc. The combination of these two systems which governed previous writing media (the volume, then the codex) results in an entirely original relation to texts…. (Harnad, 2001).
But this is to suggest that to “license” the online chat user’s practices into a full developmental role in producing new communicative forms, we will need to examine the highly regulated field of literary theory. Landow indeed shows clear convergence between online practices – at least as directed by technical innovations – and high-cultural literary theories of text production (authorship) and reception (reading). But Landow was, and is, involved in constructing online hypertextual aids to the study of conventional high-culture texts. His work focused on intertextual and contextual studies into nineteenth century literature. While it may seem curious to deal first with text, in a study which aims to show the relative fluidity of online chat as a form of talk, it does seem necessary to consider the degree to which comparatively recent moves to acknowledge the active role of readers as opposed to writers of literary texts have established legitimacy for views of language itself as made meaningful as much in reception as in production. Given the distantiation of online text, as noted in the Introduction above, the “talk” relations of online chat rest more securely on text reception than those of their real-life equivalents. Active interpretation in reception is as central to chat practice as Landow has established it is for contemporary literary theorists. 

Iser does not analyse actual readings of texts, but proceeds from an ideal “implied reader” to valorize readings both with and against the predispositions of the text. For Iser, the reader does not mine out an objective meaning hidden within the text. Rather, literature generates effects of meaning for an actual reader, in a shared virtual space created between reader and text (Iser, The Act of Reading, p. 134).

>>@@//Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Will it work?]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
You've been saving your work, right? ... 
In the folder where you put your file, there'll be a bunch of time-stamped files, one for each time you saved. Open these up to find the one you want. Then copy the right one and rename it to whatever name you were using. Open this one up again in your browser, and you're away.
Barton, D. and Hamilton, M. (1998) //Local Literacies: Reading and Writing in One Community//. London:Routledge.

Bolter, J. (1991). //Writing Space: The Computer, Hypertext, and the History of Writing//. Mahwah, New Jersey, USA: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.
Bull, Geoff ; Anstey, Michele. (2005) 'What is text?'. in "//The literacy landscape//". Frenchs Forest, N.S.W. : Pearson Education, 2005.
 
Cairney, Trevor H. (2002).' 'Bridging Home and School Literacy: In Search of Transformative Approaches to Curriculum'. in  //Early Child Development & Care//; Apr2002, Vol. 172 Issue 2, p153-172, 20p 

Carey, J. (1985). //Communication as Culture: Essays on Media and Society//. Boston: Unwin Hyman.

Carr,  Nicholas. (2008). 'Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet is doing to our brains'. July/August 2008 //ATLANTIC MAGAZINE//  
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Carr,  Nicholas. (2010). //The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains//.  New York. W. W. Norton & Company 

Carr,  Nicholas. (2010). 'CHAOS THEORY''. //Wired magazine//. June 2010. Pages 112 - 118.

Chandler, D. (1999). The Sapir-Whorf hypothesis. Retrieved May 03, 2010, from the World Wide Web: http://www.aber.ac.uk/~dgc/whorg.html 

Christie, F. (1998). 'Learning the literacies of primary and secondary schooling'. In F. Christie &  R. Mission, (Eds.), //Literacy and schooling// (pp. 47-73). London: Routledge.Halliday, M. (1985a).

Comte, A. (2002). Use of Feminist Literary Theory in Developing a Critical Language for Hypertext. The Journal of the Australian Association of Writing Programs, 6(1).
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http://smg.media.mit.edu/people/Judith/Identity/IdentityDeception.html 

Crawford, Matthew B. (2009) Interview with Guy Raz. 'Soulcraft' Honors An Honest Day's Work (transcript). All Things Considered. NPR. 12 July 2009.

Donath, J. (1999). Identity and deception in the virtual community. In P. Kollock & M. Smith (Eds.), Communities in Cyberspace (pp. 29-59). London: Routledge.

Draft K–10 Australian Curriculum, version 1.0.1 downloaded from the [[ACARA Australian Curriculum Consultation Portal|http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home]] 21/04/2010.

Edwards, J. (1985). //Language, society and identity//. Oxford: Blackwell.

Fiumara, G. (1995). //The Other Side of Language: A Philosophy of Listening//. London: Routledge.

Haliday, M.A.K. (1985) //An Introduction to Functional Grammar//. London: Edward Arnold.

Halliday, M. (1985a).  'Systemic background'. In J. Benson & W. Greaves (Eds.), //Systemic Perspectives on Discourse// (Vol. 1, pp. 1 -15). Norwood, NJ: Ablex Publishing Corporation.

Harnad, S. (2001). Back to the Oral Tradition: Comments on Roger Chartier's Paper: “Readers and Readings in the Electronic Age”. Retrieved May, 05, 2010, from the World Wide Web: http://www.text-e.org/ 

Harris, Pauline. (2006) 'A sociocultural model of reading', in //Reading in the primary school years//. South Melbourne, Vic. Social Science Press, 2006.

Herring, S. (1994). [[Gender Differences in Computer-Mediated Communication: Bringing Familiar Baggage to the New Frontier[[. Retrieved April, 29, 2010, from the World Wide Web: http://www.cpsr.org/cpsr/gender/herring.txt 

Herring, S. (2002). Computer-mediated Discourse. In D. Schiffrin & D. Tannen & H. Hamilton (Eds.), [[The Handbook of Discourse Analysis]]. Washington D.C.: Georgetown University.

Iser, W. (1978). //The Act of Reading//. London: Routledge & Kegan Paul.

Johnston, Ken, Hayes, Debra.(2008). 'This is as good as it gets: Classroom lessons and learning in challenging circumstances.' //Australian Journal of Language & Literacy//; Jun2008, Vol. 31 Issue 2, p109-127, 19p, 2 Charts.

Jones, S. (Ed.). (1995). [[CyberSociety: Computer-mediated communication and community]]. London: Sage publications.

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Kristeva, Julia. (1980) //in Language: A Semiotic Approach to Literature and Art//, ed. by Leon S. Roudiez, trans. by Thomas Gora, Alice Jardine and Leon S. Roudiez. New York: Columbia University Press.

Kristeva, J. (1984). //Revolution in Poetic Language//. New York: Columbia University Press.

Kristeva, J. (1989). //Language the unknown: an initiation into linguistics// (A. Menke, Trans.). New York: Columbia University Press.

Landow, G. (1997). Hypertext 2.0: //The Convergence of Contemporary Critical Theory and Technology//. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press.

Landow, G. (1994). //Hypertext and Critical Theory//. Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press.
Lowenthal, P. R., & Wilson, B. G. (2010). 'Labels do matter! A critique of AECT’s redefinition of the field'. //TechTrends//, 54(1), 38-46.

McElhearn, K. (2000). //Writing Conversation: An Analysis of Speech Events in E-mail Mailing Lists//. Aston University Language Studies Unit. Retrieved April, 19, 2010, from the World Wide Web: http://www.mcelhearn.com/cmc.html

National Curriculum (England, Wales and Northern Ireland) see, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Curriculum_(England,_Wales_and_Northern_Ireland) Viewed 20 April, 2010.

[[Neuage]], T. (1995). //Graffiti as Text//. Honours Thesis. Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria, Australia.

[[Neuage]],  T. (2001) //Emoticons// http://neuage.org/se/phd/storm/abreviations.htm 

[[Neuage]], t. (1994) //Masters thesis: Influence of the World Wide Web on literature// online at http://neuage.org/masters1.html

[[Neuage]],  T. (2005) //Conversational Analysis of Chatroom talk// University of South Australia, 2005. 452 p. : ill. (some col.); 30 cm. + 1 CD-ROM (4 3/4 in.). National Library of Australia. Online at http://neuage.org/thesis.htm

OECD. (2003). //The PISA 2003 assessment framework-mathematics, reading, science and problem solving knowledge and skills//. Retrieved from  www.oecd.org/dataoecd/38/52/33707212.pdf, downloaded May 07, 2010.

Ong, W. (1993). //Orality and Literacy: the Technologizing of the Word//. London: Routledge.

Rheingold, H. (1985). //Tools for Thought//. New York: Simon & Schuster.

Rheingold, H. (1991). //Virtual Reality//. New York: Summit.

Rheingold, H. (1993). //The Virtual Community//. Reading, Mass: Addison-Wesley.

Rheingold, H. (1994). 'A slice of life in my virtual community'. In L. Harasim (Ed.), //Global Networks: Computers and International Communication//. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Rheingold, H. (1999). //Rethinking Virtual Communities//. Retrieved, from the World Wide Web: http://www.rheingold.com/VirtualCommunity.html 21 April, 2010

Rheingold, H. (2000). //Community Development In The Cybersociety of the Future//. Retrieved May 2, 2010, from the World Wide Web: http://instruct1.cit.cornell.edu/courses/govt312/Rheingold.htm 

Salen, Katie. 'Gaming Literacies: A game Design Study in Action'. //Journal of Educational Multimedia and Hypermedia// (2007) 16(3), 301-322. You can contact Ms. Salen at //Parsons The New School of Design// or email her at katie.salen@gmail.com 

Schiano, D. (1997). 'Convergent Methodologies in Cyber-Psychology: A Case Study'. //Behavior Research Methods, Instruments and Computers//, 29(2), 270-273.

Seifer, Marc. Professor of psychology at Roger Williams University, Rhode Island, USA and avid writer (([[From Freud to Gurdjieff|http://www.marcseifer.com/inward.htm]] and the acclaimed //[[Wizard: The Life & Times of Nicola Tesla|http://www.amazon.com/Wizard-Nikola-Biography-Genius-Citadel/dp/0806519606/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274892561&sr=1-1]]//, (his newer work, 2009) //[[Transcending the speed of Light: Consciousness, Quantum Physics, and the Fifth Dimension|http://www.amazon.com/Transcending-Speed-Light-Consciousness-Dimension/dp/1594772290/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274892561&sr=1-3]]//, His well known //[[The Definitive Book of Handwriting Analysis: The Complete Guide to Interpreting Personalities, Detecting Forgeries, and Revealing Brain Activity Through the Science of Graphology|http://www.amazon.com/Definitive-Book-Handwriting-Analysis-Personalities/dp/1601630255/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1274892561&sr=1-2]]//,, several novels and currently working on a book about my brother, during conversations about metaphysics and hyperlinks and the ways of the World Wide Web and its effects on consciousness, at his home in Rhode Island the weekend of May 15 - 18, 2010.

Short, K., & Harste, J., with Burke, C. (1996). //Creating classrooms for authors and inquirers//. Heinemann: Portsmouth, NH.

Siemieniuch, C., & Sinclair, M. (1994). Concurrent engineering and CSCW: The human factor. In //Computer support for cooperative work//. Chichester, England: John Wiley & Sons.
//STELLA Standards Framework// http://www.stella.org.au/

Stubbs, M. (1996). [[Text and Corpus Analysis: Computer-assisted Studies of Language and Culture[[. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Stubbs, P. (1998). Conflict and Co-Operation in the Virtual Community: e-mail and the Wars of the Yugoslav Succession. [[Sociological Research Online]], 3(3).

Strassmann, P. (1997).' Information Systems and Literacy'. In G. Hawisher & C. Selfe (Eds.), //Literacy, Technology, and Society// (pp. 134-141). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice-Hill.

Thompson, J. (1995). //The Media and Modernity: A social theory of the media//. Cambridge: Polity.

Trubek, Anne. (2010)  Handwriting Is History. Writing words by hand is a technology that’s just too slow for our times, and our minds. //Culture Culture & Society Education// January-February 2010 MAGAZINES Miller-McCune Research Essay online at http://www.miller-mccune.com/culture-society/handwriting-is-history-6540/  Viewed 2 May, 2010

Youngjoo, Yi.  'Adolescent literacy and identity construction among 1.5 generation students: From a transnational perspective.'  //Journal of Asian Pacific Communication//, Volume 19,&nbsp;Number 1, 2009 , pp. 100-129(30). John Benjamins Publishing Company.
Click on 'save changes' over on the right-hand side.
Watch for the yellow pop-up on the top right reading 'Main ~TiddlyWiki file saved'.
Do not, I repeat, ''do not'' try to save your page through the browser menu system. ''Beware'': Hot key sequences such as '~Ctrl-S' will do this in a flash.
If you're in a tizz, try clicking this button: <<saveChanges "Emergency Save" "Deep breath!">>

For the paranoid, go to 'options' on the right and check the '~AutoSave' box. If you take this sensible choice, you'll need to keep an eye on your disk space.
Albatross
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Eagle
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Birdie
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Par
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Bogie
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Double Bogie
----
Air Shot
 //[[Multimodal Texts|http://neuage.tiddlyspot.com/]]//   7th Grade = <html><object width="250" param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/iJKSzajubGo&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/iJKSzajubGo&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x402061&color2=0x9461ca&border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="250" embed></object></html> [[8th Grade|http://neuage.org/AA/computer_writing.htm]] <html> <object width="250" param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ag0UOPfV2p0&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ag0UOPfV2p0&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x234900&color2=0x4e9e00" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="250" embed></object></html>4th Grade =<html><object width="250" param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/V3c5VbHk3KI&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x5d1719&color2=0xcd311b&border=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/V3c5VbHk3KI&hl=en_US&fs=1&color1=0x5d1719&color2=0xcd311b&border=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="250" embed></object> </html>
Assignment 2 [[Terrell Neuage |http://neuage.org]] 
 
.inlineTags ul li { display:inline; }
* Please submit by the Due Date
* Submit your assignment using Learnline
* Stay near the word length
* Don't copy other people's work or recycle your own work
* If you really do have extenuating circumstances, contact your lecturer
* Extension requests should be received well before the Due Date
* Extensions aren't really possible on this assessment item
* Submit early if you can
* Keep a copy of your work (having a systematic backup regime is even better)
!DO NOT USE TOWARD WORD COUNT FOR ASSIGNMENT TWO - REFERENCES TO ASYNCHRONOUOS/SYNCHRONOUS ONLY

Synchronous communication is communication that is taking place at the same time. Several voices can be going at once or there can be multiple conversations involving multiple subjects happening at the same time. Several currently used examples of synchronous communication are: Chatrooms, MUDs (multiple-user dungeons), MOOs (multiple object orientations), videoconferencing (with tools like White Pine’s CUSeeMe and Microsoft's NetMeeting) and teleWeb delivery systems that combine video programs with Web-based resources, activities and print-based materials.
To use synchronous communication in a text-based environment one can have the chatroom on their server or the chatroom can be imported into their Web site as an applet. An applet is a program written in the Java programming language that can be included in an HTML page, much in the same way an image is included. These programs open in a separate window from the main source window being used. Real-time interactive environments like MUDs and MOOs are Unix-based programs that reside on servers.&nbsp; In both kinds of synchronous communication, users connect with the help of chat-client software and log in to virtual “rooms” where they communicate with each other by typing onscreen. Because MOOs and chatrooms frequently attract many users, it is advisable to access them using a high-end computer and a fast connection to the Internet. MOOs and chatrooms often have their own sound effects to denote communicative gestures (such as laughter and surprise); to use or hear them; the computer must be equipped with a sound card and speakers.&nbsp;&nbsp;

See [[Asynchronous communication]].
/***
|Name|TagCloudPlugin|
|Source|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#TagCloudPlugin|
|Version|1.7.0|
|Author|Eric Shulman|
|Original Author|Clint Checketts|
|License|http://www.TiddlyTools.com/#LegalStatements|
|~CoreVersion|2.1|
|Type|plugin|
|Description|present a 'cloud' of tags (or links) using proportional font display|
!Usage
<<<
{{{
<<cloud type action:... limit:... tag tag tag ...>>
<<cloud type action:... limit:... +TiddlerName>>
<<cloud type action:... limit:... -TiddlerName>>
<<cloud type action:... limit:... =tagvalue>>
}}}
where:
* //type// is a keyword, one of:
** ''tags'' (default) - displays a cloud of tags, based on frequency of use
** ''links'' - displays a cloud of tiddlers, based on number of links //from// each tiddler
** ''references'' - displays a cloud of tiddlers, based on number of links //to// each tiddler
* ''action:popup'' (default) - clicking a cloud item shows a popup with links to related tiddlers<br>//or//<br> ''action:goto'' - clicking a cloud item immediately opens the tiddler corresponding to that item
* ''limit:N'' (optional) - restricts the cloud display to only show the N most popular tags/links
* ''tag tag tag...'' (or ''title title title'' if ''links''/''references'' is used)<br>shows all tags/links in the document //except// for those listed as macro parameters
* ''+~TiddlerName''<br>show only tags/links read from a space-separated, bracketed list stored in a separate tiddler.
* ''-~TiddlerName''<br>show all tags/links //except// those read from a space-separated, bracketed list stored in a separate tiddler.
* ''=tagvalue'' (//only if type=''tags''//)<br>shows only tags that are themselves tagged with the indicated tag value (i.e., ~TagglyTagging usage)
//note: for backward-compatibility, you can also use the macro {{{<<tagCloud ...>>}}} in place of {{{<<cloud ...>>}}}//
<<<
!Examples
<<<
//all tags excluding<<tag systemConfig>>, <<tag excludeMissing>> and <<tag script>>//
{{{<<cloud systemConfig excludeMissing script>>}}}
{{groupbox{<<cloud systemConfig excludeMissing script>>}}}
//top 10 tags excluding<<tag systemConfig>>, <<tag excludeMissing>> and <<tag script>>//
{{{<<cloud limit:10 systemConfig excludeMissing script>>}}}
{{groupbox{<<cloud limit:10 systemConfig excludeMissing script>>}}}
//tags listed in// [[FavoriteTags]]
{{{<<cloud +FavoriteTags>>}}}
{{groupbox{<<cloud +FavoriteTags>>}}}
//tags NOT listed in// [[FavoriteTags]]
{{{<<cloud -FavoriteTags>>}}}
{{groupbox{<<cloud -FavoriteTags>>}}}
//links to tiddlers tagged with 'package'//
{{{<<cloud action:goto =package>>}}}
{{groupbox{<<cloud action:goto =package>>}}}
//top 20 most referenced tiddlers//
{{{<<cloud references limit:20>>}}}
{{groupbox{<<cloud references limit:20>>}}}
//top 20 tiddlers that contain the most links//
{{{<<cloud links limit:20>>}}}
{{groupbox{<<cloud links limit:20>>}}}
<<<
!Revisions
<<<
2009.07.17 [1.7.0] added {{{-TiddlerName}}} parameter to exclude tags that are listed in the indicated tiddler
2009.02.26 [1.6.0] added {{{action:...}}} parameter to apply popup vs. goto action when clicking cloud items
2009.02.05 [1.5.0] added ability to show links or back-links (references) instead of tags and renamed macro to {{{<<cloud>>}}} to reflect more generalized usage.
2008.12.16 [1.4.2] corrected group calculation to prevent 'group=0' error
2008.12.16 [1.4.1] revised tag filtering so excluded tags don't affect calculations
2008.12.15 [1.4.0] added {{{limit:...}}} parameter to restrict the number of tags displayed to the top N most popular
2008.11.15 [1.3.0] added {{{+TiddlerName}}} parameter to include only tags that are listed in the indicated tiddler
2008.09.05 [1.2.0] added '=tagname' parameter to include only tags that are themselves tagged with the specified value (i.e., ~TagglyTagging usage)
2008.07.03 [1.1.0] added 'segments' property to macro object.  Extensive code cleanup
<<<
!Code
***/
//{{{
version.extensions.TagCloudPlugin= {major: 1, minor: 7 , revision: 0, date: new Date(2009,7,17)};
//Originally created by Clint Checketts, contributions by Jonny Leroy and Eric Shulman
//Currently maintained and enhanced by Eric Shulman
//}}}
//{{{
config.macros.cloud = {
	tagstip: "%1 tiddlers tagged with '%0'",
	refslabel: " (%0 references)",
	refstip: "%1 tiddlers have links to '%0'",
	linkslabel: " (%0 links)",
	linkstip: "'%0' has links to %1 other tiddlers",
	groups: 9,
	init: function() {
		config.macros.tagCloud=config.macros.cloud; // for backward-compatibility
		config.shadowTiddlers.TagCloud='<<cloud>>';
		config.shadowTiddlers.StyleSheetTagCloud=
			'/*{{{*/\n'
			+'.tagCloud span {line-height: 3.5em; margin:3px;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud1{font-size: 80%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud2{font-size: 100%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud3{font-size: 120%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud4{font-size: 140%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud5{font-size: 160%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud6{font-size: 180%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud7{font-size: 200%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud8{font-size: 220%;}\n'
			+'.tagCloud9{font-size: 240%;}\n'
			+'/*}}}*/\n';
		setStylesheet(store.getTiddlerText('StyleSheetTagCloud'),'tagCloudsStyles');
	},
	getLinks: function(tiddler) { // get list of links to existing tiddlers and shadows
		if (!tiddler.linksUpdated) tiddler.changed();
		var list=[]; for (var i=0; i<tiddler.links.length; i++) {
			var title=tiddler.links[i];
			if (store.isShadowTiddler(title)||store.tiddlerExists(title))
				list.push(title);
		}
		return list;
	},
	handler: function(place,macroName,params) {
		// unpack params
		var inc=[]; var ex=[]; var limit=0; var action='popup';
		var links=(params[0]&&params[0].toLowerCase()=='links'); if (links) params.shift();
		var refs=(params[0]&&params[0].toLowerCase()=='references'); if (refs) params.shift();
		if (params[0]&&params[0].substr(0,7).toLowerCase()=='action:')
			action=params.shift().substr(7).toLowerCase();
		if (params[0]&&params[0].substr(0,6).toLowerCase()=='limit:')
			limit=parseInt(params.shift().substr(6));
		while (params.length) {
			if (params[0].substr(0,1)=='+') { // read taglist from tiddler
				inc=inc.concat(store.getTiddlerText(params[0].substr(1),'').readBracketedList());
			} else if (params[0].substr(0,1)=='-') { // exclude taglist from tiddler
				ex=ex.concat(store.getTiddlerText(params[0].substr(1),'').readBracketedList());
			} else if (params[0].substr(0,1)=='=') { // get tag list using tagged tags
				var tagged=store.getTaggedTiddlers(params[0].substr(1));
				for (var t=0; t<tagged.length; t++) inc.push(tagged[t].title);
			} else ex.push(params[0]); // exclude params
			params.shift();
		}
		// get all items, include/exclude specific items
		var items=[];
		var list=(links||refs)?store.getTiddlers('title','excludeLists'):store.getTags();
		for (var t=0; t<list.length; t++) {
			var title=(links||refs)?list[t].title:list[t][0];
			if (links)	var count=this.getLinks(list[t]).length;
			else if (refs)	var count=store.getReferringTiddlers(title).length;
			else 		var count=list[t][1];
			if ((!inc.length||inc.contains(title))&&(!ex.length||!ex.contains(title)))
				items.push({ title:title, count:count });
		}
		if(!items.length) return;
		// sort by decending count, limit results (optional)
		items=items.sort(function(a,b){return(a.count==b.count)?0:(a.count>b.count?-1:1);});
		while (limit && items.length>limit) items.pop();
		// find min/max and group size
		var most=items[0].count;
		var least=items[items.length-1].count;
		var groupSize=(most-least+1)/this.groups;
		// sort by title and draw the cloud of items
		items=items.sort(function(a,b){return(a.title==b.title)?0:(a.title>b.title?1:-1);});
		var cloudWrapper = createTiddlyElement(place,'div',null,'tagCloud',null);
		for (var t=0; t<items.length; t++) {
			cloudWrapper.appendChild(document.createTextNode(' '));
			var group=Math.ceil((items[t].count-least)/groupSize)||1;
			var className='tagCloudtag tagCloud'+group;
			var tip=refs?this.refstip:links?this.linkstip:this.tagstip;
			tip=tip.format([items[t].title,items[t].count]);
			if (action=='goto') { // TAG/LINK/REFERENCES GOTO
				var btn=createTiddlyLink(cloudWrapper,items[t].title,true,className);
				btn.title=tip;
				btn.style.fontWeight='normal';
			} else if (!links&&!refs) { // TAG POPUP
				var btn=createTiddlyButton(cloudWrapper,items[t].title,tip,onClickTag,className);
				btn.setAttribute('tag',items[t].title);
			} else { // LINK/REFERENCES POPUP
				var btn=createTiddlyButton(cloudWrapper,items[t].title,tip,
					function(ev) { var e=ev||window.event; var cmt=config.macros.cloud;
						var popup = Popup.create(this);
						var title = this.getAttribute('tiddler');
						var count = this.getAttribute('count');
						var refs  = this.getAttribute('refs')=='T';
						var links = this.getAttribute('links')=='T';
						var label = (refs?cmt.refslabel:cmt.linkslabel).format([count]);
						createTiddlyLink(popup,title,true);
						createTiddlyText(popup,label);
						createTiddlyElement(popup,'hr');
						if (refs) {
							popup.setAttribute('tiddler',title);
							config.commands.references.handlePopup(popup,title);
						}
						if (links) {
							var tiddler = store.fetchTiddler(title);
							var links=config.macros.cloud.getLinks(tiddler);
							for(var i=0;i<links.length;i++)
								createTiddlyLink(createTiddlyElement(popup,'li'),
									links[i],true);
						}
						Popup.show();
						e.cancelBubble=true; if(e.stopPropagation) e.stopPropagation();
						return false;
					}, className);
				btn.setAttribute('tiddler',items[t].title);
				btn.setAttribute('count',items[t].count);
				btn.setAttribute('refs',refs?'T':'F');
				btn.setAttribute('links',links?'T':'F');
				btn.title=tip;
			}
		}
	}
};
//}}}
Ted Nelson and Xanadu
Ted Nelson originally invented the word "hypertext" for "non-sequential writing". His long-standing interest in all things related to HT became the Xanadu project. The Xanadu Operating Company was owned for a while by Autodesk, but later dropped. (Not clear in 1993 what is going to happen there)
He describes himself, his colleagues, his philosophy and his project in "Literary Machines" which is an attempt to put his hypertext thoughts onto paper. He publishes it himself (I have a copy of LM 90.1 -TBL). This is essential reading as background, enthusiathm and ideas on hypertext. (It includes also the text of Vannevar Bush's "As we may think". This is an article published in 1945 which suggests that an automated "MEMEX" (memory extension) would allow human memory to be augmented by mechanical means.) Xanadu has many interesting concepts: for example, Nelson has tackled the problem of generating unique names for new documents such that they can be found, and the Xanadu project will aim to attribute royalties to the author of a work whenever it is retrieved across the network. Ted also publishes a video of himself explaining his ideas. T.H.Nelson, Mindful Press 3020 Brudgeway Suite 295, Sausolito CA 94965, phone 415/331-442. 
see: http://www.w3.org/Xanadu.html#Nelson
Dr. Terrell [[Neuage|http://neuage.org]]
!!CURENT RESEARCH
# GRIN technologies': [Genetics, Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, and Nanotechnology] impact on communicational evolutions; how will we translate meaning from sender to receiver if the ‘decoder’ is inserted in the minds of but a fraction of society? An extension to my [[PhD]] thesis: ‘Conversational Analysis of Chatroom “talk”’
# Philosophical clashes between longevity (the race to extend life cycles without end) ~ reincarnation and traditional Christianity.
# Notes on Secondlife project [Division or Synchronization can the person still exist when there is no physical counterpoint?]
[[Dr. Terrell Neuage|http://neuage.org]]
The Melbourne Declaration online at http://www.adlaustralia.org/aatgc/melbourne-declaration.html 
>The Declaration was endorsed by a range of government and industry representatives from countries including Australia, the U.S., Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, the U.K. and Mexico. 
TiddlyWiki is a reusable non-linear personal web notebook. This is version <<version>>. For more details see the links listed in the [[Find out more]] tiddler.
A National Curriculum is already in place in England, Wales and Northern Ireland as a nationwide curriculum for primary and secondary state schools following the Education Reform Act 1988. The United States of America has a [[Draft K-12 Common Core State Standards Available for Comment]] at the same time that Australia is working towards a National Curriculum.
>'The countries that have left the United States behind in math and science education have one thing in common: They offer the same high education standards — often the same curriculum — from one end of the nation to the other' ([[National School Standards, at Last]]). In [[VISION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING]] what will be the guiding principles to advance New York in technology is that //All New York State learners will develop technological literacy to enter college//. By making state-wide standards New Yorkers will be able to integrate technology into the curriculum. I have not found this in any documentation for Australia as yet.
After going through the proposal and the [[ACARA]] website it is evident that this is not a dictatorial framework. As discussed in [[Activity 2.3]] teaching can be very individualized within an institutionalized setting. The [[myread]] http://www.myread.org website is a tool that provides suggestions that will assist teachers as they integrate the [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum]]. As is stated on the website for [[ACARA]] 
>'Whilst the Australian Curriculum will outline the scope of what is to be learned, it will be teachers in classrooms who will make decisions about how best to organise learning, the contexts for learning and the depth of learning that will be pursued for each child in their class.'  In New York we have the [[New York State Education Department's Virtual Learning System]] to assist teachers at all levels to find their way and stay up with trends that children follow to see if they can be incorporated within the curriculum.
From the [[ACARA website|http://www.acara.edu.au/curriculum.html]]:
*[[ACARA]] is responsible for the development of the Australian curriculum from Kindergarten to Year 12.
*[[ACARA]]’s work in developing the Australian curriculum is guided by the 2008 Melbourne Declaration on Educational Goals for Young Australians.[[The Melbourne Declaration]] commits "to supporting all young Australians to become successful learners, confident and creative individuals, and active and informed citizens",’ and to promoting equity and excellence in education.
*[[ACARA]] works collaboratively with a wide range of stakeholders including teachers, principals, government, state and territory education authorities, professional education associations, business/industry, community groups and the broader public.
>It is widely accepted that Australia should have one curriculum for school students, rather than the eight different arrangements that exist at the moment. The commitment to develop an Australian Curriculum means that:
1.The individual and combined efforts of states and territories can focus on how students' learning can be improved to achieve the national goals, regardless of individual circumstances or school location.
2.Greater attention can be devoted to equipping young Australians with those skills, knowledge and capabilities necessary to enable them to effectively engage with and prosper in society, compete in a globalised world and thrive in the information-rich workplaces of the future.
3.High-quality resources can be developed more efficiently and made available around the country.
4.There will be greater consistency for the country's increasingly mobile student and teacher population.

>>//@@Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[What is literacy]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
TiddlyWiki will run in most environments that support HTML, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS), and ~JavaScript. Most browsers do this by default. Some mobile phones are a possibility even (though only 'read only' at present).

Setup and operating instructions are available here: [[How Do I?]]

[[TiddlyWiki.com|http://www.tiddlywiki.com/]] also provides detailed troubleshooting information for specific browsers and operating systems. See the [[Installation|http://www.tiddlywiki.com/#Installation]] and [[Browser|http://www.tiddlywiki.com/#Browsers]] tiddlers.

On Microsoft Windows (e.g. XP, Vista), it helps a lot if you save your file to a USB thumb drive or your local C: drive. (Try C:\Temp if you're just mucking around.) That way the browser can save your changes locally without any hassle.

If it's all getting too much, you could run everything from your USB drive using [[PortableApps|http://portableapps.com/]]. Teachers who move from class to class will find this a real boon.

Mac users should turn on Java in Safari and put the helper applet '~TiddlySaver.jar' (available from [[TiddlyWiki.com|http://www.tiddlywiki.com/]]) in the same folder as the file you're working on.

When you open your file for the first time, the first thing to do is to try and save it again with "save changes". See the menu over on the right-hand side. If that works then you should be right from now on. ... At least until you move your file to another computer.

''Warning'': when you've made some edits, use the "save changes" button to lock these in. Don't //under any circumstances// try to save the file again using the 'File', 'Save as' sequence through your browser's menu system. That will just corrupt the file for you. Remember, "save changes" works best, and you get a time-stamped back-up copy each time into the bargain.
As explained in the [[NEW YORK STATE BOARD OF REGENTS STATEWIDE LEARNING TECHNOLOGY PLAN|http://www.regents.nysed.gov/meetings/2010Meetings/February2010/0210bra3.pdf]]
!!VISION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING
>'The Regents have an urgent need to raise the knowledge, skill and opportunity of all the people of the State of New York. New technologies have created powerful new learning tools which will transform the learning environment for students of all ages. Learning technologies will be seamlessly integrated into teaching and learning to increase student achievement. USNY will use technology to measure performance and communicate results to learners, teachers, leaders, and citizens. Through USNY, New York citizens will benefit from technology that brings information and knowledge to improve their lives.'
>>'USNY will provide learning technologies that change how students learn, what they learn, and why they learn. Students will access information to broaden and deepen knowledge about subjects in ways unimagined by prior generations.'
>>>All students will access learning materials in electronic form, including video, text, and other digital content related to the school curriculum. Students will create work, define and solve problems, and research and evaluate information using technology. Students will manage the flow of information and use technology to work with others from diverse backgrounds and locations. Our students will develop innovative approaches to communicate and collaborate.
>>Multiple environments will exist for teaching and learning, unbound by place, time, income, language or disability. The classroom, gymnasium, laboratory, library, theater, and museum will be a workspace for teachers and learners but will not always be a physical space. Students will access learning resources anywhere, anytime through the use of technology.
>>>Technology is a path for teaching and learning, but it is also a body of practices, skill, and knowledge to be learned. All New York State learners will develop technological literacy to enter college, become productive members of the workforce, and succeed as citizens. Students, teachers, and leaders will have clear standards for what students should know and be able to do with technology; when various elements of technology will be taught; and how to embed technology in learning throughout the curriculum. These standards will be visible to the public to drive the standards even higher.
<!--{{{-->
<div class='toolbar' macro='toolbar [[ToolbarCommands::ViewToolbar]]'></div>
<div class='title' macro='view title'></div>
<div class='subtitle'><span macro='view modifier link'></span>, <span macro='view modified date'></span> (<span macro='message views.wikified.createdPrompt'></span> <span macro='view created date'></span>)</div>
<div class='tagging' macro='tagging'></div>
<div class='tagged' macro='tags'></div>
<div class='viewer' macro='view text wikified'></div>
<div class='tagClear'></div>
<!--}}}-->
The spread of literacy in turn changed communication, which changed the educational system and – to some degree at least - the class and authority structure. Literacy became a demand tool: a passport to the regulatory systems of the industrial-bureaucratic state emerging in the modern era. (Terrell [[Neuage]] [[PhD]] thesis, 2005). The spread of literacy with [[hyperlink]]s and [[hypertext]]s in the new [[Digital Literacy]] with its [[multifocal]] of [[multimodal]] texts twenty years after the invention of the WWW  by [[Tim Berners-Lee|http://www.w3.org/People/Berners-Lee/]] presents us with not only new [[collaborative]] opportunities but with new literature that can be synchronous and asynchronous in the meaning making process.

Patrizia Violi, in //Electronic dialogue between orality and literacy. A semiotic approach.// (2000) talks about writing itself as a technology, as well as computers as a technology. In the draft K–10 Australian Curriculum (page 1) under 'English Aims' there is understand and use Standard Australian English in its spoken and written forms and in combination with other 'non-linguistic forms of communication'.
[[Activity 2.2]] 
*The message of a text is dependent upon what the reader does with the text. 
*That a textual message meaning is formed within a discourse-community to bring about a certain de-coding of the text.
*Whose language is the correct one to create a literate society?

This from the start indicates the new curriculum will work toward integrating other forms of literacy. This other 'non-linguistic forms of communication bring in the multifocal and multimodals dimensions of literacy. Whether we are using a form of text-messaging or any one of the hundred different social medias available, or literay art such as picture poems, we will use non-linguistic forms to enhance our message or use the non-linguistic form to be the message.
>>Intent exists in all speech situations; what is different in a virtual space is that intent is more than usually opaque, and the anticipation of concealed or subversive intent is heightened by the lack of physical contact and non-linguistic cues. Are participants there to gather information, exchange information, or play performance games? (Neuage, 2005).
Carrington and Robinson (2009), discuss using Flickr as a communication tool especially using digital notes that c an be superimposed on another person's photos. Which provides a polysemic narrative about literacy and can promote discussion'. p.37.
>>//@@Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Digital vs. Linear]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
In essence, the reader becomes the writer-narrator, following self-chosen links. [[Hypertext]] writing shares some interesting features with folk storytelling traditions, for example, Native American due to its digressive elements (stories within stories); what is called "a story" is really a Web of stories, and like oral telling, in hypertext, no two explorations of a hypertext narrative are exactly the same for readers. In [[hypertext]] the focus is on the reader and the appearance of choice and some determination of how to read, as every part of a [[hypertext]] narrative presents multiple choices for the direction and sequence of reading. ([[Neuage]] webpage - [[course description]]

If we define writing as a system of marks to record information (and discount petroglyphs, say), handwriting has been around for just 6,000 of humanity’s some 200,000 years. Its effects have been enormous, of course: It alters the brain, changes with civilizations, cultures and factions, and plays a role in religious and political battles.  One might consider handwriting as a technology — a way to make letters — and conclude that the way of making them is of little moment. But handwriting is bound up with a host of associations and connotations that propel it beyond simply a fine-motor skill. We connect it to personal identity (handwriting signals something unique about each of us), intelligence (good handwriting reflects good thinking) and virtue (a civilized culture requires handwriting). (Neuage, PhD 2005) 

The [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum]] declares that the student ‘will be taught to hand write fluently and legibly using correct letter formation at each from K – 7.'  In lengthy discussions with Scholar [[Marc Seifer]] a leading handwriting specialists (see -) he believes that we need to write, it shows personality and as he   works with law enforcement officers to uncover legal signatures handwriting is really the only way to know  who the writer is. Marc has signatures and writings  of  many famous people as he discusses in his books.  Handwriting is opposed by some scholars ( http://www.good.is/post/stop-teaching-handwriting). Ann Trubek (2010) writes that 'Writing words by hand is a technology that’s just too slow for our times, and our minds.' 
For a summary of current pros and cons of computers and handwriting see Handwriting in the Elementary Classroom https://www.msu.edu/~kroekera/year_one_maet/word_processing_versus_hw.htm
>'Reading, and writing, is a ritual act and moreover a dramatic one. What is arrayed before the reader is not pure information but a portrayal of the contending forces in the world. Moreover, as readers make their way through the paper, they engage in a continual shift of roles or of dramatic focus' (Carey, 1985, p.175). 
See also [[Flash Childrens Stories]]


>>@@//Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Reading: Book vs. iPads]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
The 'original' [[Wiki]] is still operating: [[WikiWikiWeb|http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?WelcomeVisitors]].

To understand a bit better what makes a [[Wiki]] a [[Wiki]], see this short video: Common Craft's [[Wikis in Plain English| http://www.commoncraft.com/video-wikis-plain-english]].
//Note: this video is offered in online 'evaluation' mode.//
!!Conclusion
How is it then that we process such textual cues? Is this learned from the practices of intertextual linking, established within our reading background and acquired alongside literacy – or is it a part of our dialogic skills developed in talk: a central feature of “natural conversation”, rehearsed in everyday chat, and transferred across into text-based chatroom behaviours? How much more can our text-based “reading” traditions tell us of the chatroom texting act? ([[Neuage]] 2005)

Australia like the United States of America is embedding Information and communication technologies (ICT) into the [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum]]. In New York in [[VISION OF TECHNOLOGY FOR TEACHING AND LEARNING]] ICT it is stated that,
>//All students will access learning materials in electronic form, including video, text, and other digital content related to the school curriculum. Students will create work, define and solve problems, and research and evaluate information using technology. Students will manage the flow of information and use technology to work with others from diverse backgrounds and locations. Our students will develop innovative approaches to communicate and collaborate.//
We will be sharing [[literature of other cultures]], establishing [[transnational identities]] in a [[collaborative]] effort and Australia's curriculum could someday be a part of an international curriculum all online with little need for teachers as we have them today. Already in Korea experiments are underway with [[robots teaching classes|http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1514163&dl=GUIDE&coll=GUIDE&CFID=91878793&CFTOKEN=57153175]], [[South Korea unveils teaching robot|http://weareaustin.com/fulltext?nxd_id=65896]] and China is close behind. 

As discussed in [[Activity 2.7 response]] Australia has a strong standing for Internet usage.
>[[World Internet Usage]]
*[img[World Internet Usage|http://neuage.info/tiddler/WorldInternetUsage.PNG]]
>[[Australian Internet Usage]]
*[img[Australian Internet Usage|http://neuage.info/tiddler/InternetUsageAustralia.PNG]]
>[[Australian Penetrations]]
*[img[Australian Penetrations|http://neuage.info/tiddler/InternetPenetration.PNG]]


>>@@//Are you following this in an old fashion we can not believe you would do such a thing fashion? Then go to [[Introduction]] otherwise hype off to [[ODAM]]. How so yesterday ~ how so anti-tiddler, how so normal – good on ya because you will be focused and not an  uncentred-[[multifocal]] individual.@@//
merge(config.macros,{
	wordCount: {
		handler: function(place,macroName,params,wikifier,paramString,tiddler) {
			createTiddlyText(place,tiddler&&tiddler.text?tiddler.text.match(/\w+/g).length:"0");
		}
	}
});
To use put this somewhere in your ViewTemplate:
<div style="font-size:80%">(<span macro="wordCount"></span> words)</div>
!World Internet Usage
*[img[World Internet Usage|http://neuage.info/tiddler/WorldInternetUsage.PNG]]
!!See [[Activity 2.7 response]] for a discussion of this
collection of abbreviations 1995 - 2000 [[Neuage]] PhD from emoticons
AFK = Away From Keyboard

afk away from keyboard

ATK = At the Keyboard 

BAK = Back At Keyboard 

bbiab be back in a bit 

BBL = Be Back Later 

bbl be back later 

BFN or B4N = Bye For Now 

BRB = Be Right Back 

brb be right back 

BRT = Be Right There 

BTW = By The Way 

btw by the way 

CYA = See ya

FWIW = For What It's Worth 

fyi for your information 

GMTA = Great Minds Think Alike 

IMHO = In My Humble Opinion 

imo in my opinion 

IRL = In Real Life 

iyo in your opinion 

L8R = Later  

lmao laughing my ass off 

LOL = Laughing Out Loud 

LOL laughing out loud 

LTNS = Long Time No See 

OIC = Oh I see 

pita pain in the ass 

ROFL = Rolling On the Floor Laughing 

ROTF = Rolling On The Floor (variation of above) 

TTFN = Ta-Ta For Now! 

TTYL = Talk To You Later 

WB = Welcome Back 

WTG = Way To Go! 

2B or not 2B
 To Be Or Not To Be
 
4ever
 Forever
 
A/S/L
 Age/Sex/Location
 
AFAIC
 As Far As I'm Concerned
 
AFAIK
 As Far As I Know
 
AFK
 Away From Keyboard
 
AIAMU
 And I'm A Monkey's Uncle
 
AISI
 As I See It
 
AKA
 Also Known As
 
AMBW
 All My Best Wishes
 
ANFAWFOWS
 And Now For A Word Word From Our Web Sponsor
 
AOTS
 All Of The Sudden
 
ASAFP
 As Soon As "Friggin" Possible
 
ASAP
 As Soon As Possible
 
ATST
 At The Same Time
 
AWGTHTGTTA
 Are We Going To Have To Go Through This Again
 
AWGTHTGTTSA
 Are We Going To Have To Go Through This Sh** Again
 
AYSOS
 Are You Stupid Or Something
 
B4
 Before
 
B4N
 Bye For Now
 
BBFBBM
 Body By Fisher, Brains by Mattel
 
BBIAB
 Be Back In A Bit
 
BBIAF
 Be Back In A Few
 
BBL
 Be Back Later
 
BBN
 Bye Bye Now
 
BCNU
 Be Seein' You
 
BFD
 Big F***ing Deal
 
BFN
 Bye For Now
 
BHOF
 Bald Headed Old Fart
 
BIF
 Basis In Fact
 
BITD
 Back In The Day
 
BM
 Byte Me
 
BMOTA
 Byte Me On The Ass
 
BNF
 Big Name Fan
 
BOHICA
 Bend Over Here It Comes Again
 
BR
 Bathroom
 
BRB
 Be Right Back
 
BRT
 Be Right There
 
BS
 Big Smile
 
BT
 Byte This
 
BTDT
 Been There Done That
 
BTSOOM
 Beats The Sh** Out Of Me
 
BTW
 By The Way
 
BTWBO
 Be There With Bells On
 
BWDIK
 But What Do I Know?
 
BWO
 Black, White or Other
 
CIAO
 Goodbye (in Italian)
 
CID
 Consider It Done
 
CIO
 Check It Out
 
CIS
 CompuServe Information Service
 
CMF
 Count My Fingers
 
Cof$
 Church of Scientology
 
CRAFT
 Can't Remember a F***ing Thing
 
CRAWS
 Can't Remember Anything Worth A Sh**
 
CSL
 Can't Stop Laughing
 
CTC
 Choaking The Chicken
 
CUL8R
 See You Later
 
CWYL
 Chat With You Later
 
CYA
 Cover Your Ass
 
CYL
 See You Later
 
DBEYR
 Don't Believe Everything You Read
 
DD
 Due Diligence
 
DDD
 Direct Distance Dial
 
DETI
 Don't Even Think It
 
DGT
 Don't Go There
 
DHYB
 Don't Hold Your Breath
 
DILLIGAD
 Do I Look Like I Give A Damn
 
DILLIGAS
 Do I Look Like I Give A Sh**
 
DKDC
 Don't Know Don't Care
 
DLTM
 Don't Lie To Me
 
DQYDJ
 Don't Quit You're Day Job
 
DRIB
 Don't Read If Busy
 
DYSTSOTT
 Did You See The Size Of That Thing
 
EG
 Evil Grin
 
EOM
 End Of Message
 
ESO
 Equipment Smarter than Operator
 
F2F
 Face-to-Face
 
FBKS
 Failure Between Keyboard and Seat
 
FE
 Fatal Error
 
FF&PN
 Fresh Fields and Pastures New
 
FO
 F*** Off
 
FOAF
 Friend Of A Friend
 
FTASB
 Faster Than A Speeding Bullet
 
FTL
 Faster Than Light
 
FTTB
 For The Time Being
 
FUBAR
 F***ed Up Beyond All Recognition
 
FUBB
 F***ed Up Beyond Belief
 
FUD
 (Spreading) Fear, Uncertainty, and Disinformation
 
FWIW
 For What It's Worth
 
FYA
 For Your Amusement
 
FYI
 For Your Information
 
FYM
 For Your Misinformation
 
GAL
 Get A Life
 
GG
 Good Game or Gotta Go
 
GIGO
 Garbage In, Garbage Out
 
GIWIST
 Gee, I Wish I'd Said That
 
GL
 Good Luck
 
GLYASDI
 God Loves You And So Do I
 
GMTA
 Great Minds Think Alike
 
GNBLFY
 Got Nothing But Love For You
 
GR&D
 Grinning Running And Ducking
 
GR8
 Great
 
GRRRR
 "Growling"
 
GSOAS
 Go Sit On A Snake
 
GTG
 Got To Go
 
GTGB
 Got To Go, Bye
 
GTGP
 Got To Go Pee
 
GTH
 Go To Hell
 
GTSY
 Glad To See Ya
 
GYPO
 Get Your Pants Off
 
HAGO
 Have A Good One
 
HAK
 Hugs And Kisses
 
HB
 Hurry Back
 
HD
 Hold
 
HHO1/2K
 Ha Ha, Only Half Kidding
 
HHOK
 Ha Ha, Only Kidding
 
HIOOC
 Help! I'm Out of Coffee
 
HTH
 Hope This (That) Helps
 
HUA
 Heads Up Ace
 
HUYA
 Head Up Your A**
 
IAC
 In Any Case
 
IAE
 In Any Event
 
IANAC
 I Am Not A Crook
 
IANAL
 I Am Not A Lawyer
 
IBT
 In Between Technology
 
IBTD
 I Beg To Differ
 
IC
 In Character
 
IDGAF
 I Don't Give A F***
 
IDGI
 I Don't Get It
 
IDK
 I Don't Know
 
IDKY
 I Don't Know You
 
IDST
 I Didn't Say That
 
IDTS
 I Don't Think So
 
IFAB
 I Found A Bug
 
IFU
 I F***ed Up
 
IGGP
 I Gotta Go Pee
 
IIIO
 Intel Inside, Idiot Outside
 
IIMAD
 If It Makes An(y) Difference
 
IIRC
 If I Remember Correctly
 
IIWM
 If It Were Me
 
ILICISCOMK
 I Laughed, I Cried, I Spat/Spilt Coffee/Crumbs/Coke On My Keyboard
 
ILY
 I Love You
 
IMHO
 In My Humble Opinion
 
IMNSHO
 In My Not So Humble Opinion
 
IMO
 In My Opinion
 
INMP
 It's Not My Problem
 
INPO
 In No Particular Order
 
IOH
 I'm Outta Here
 
IOW
 In Other Words
 
IRL
 In Real Life
 
ISS
 I Said So
 
ITM
 In The Money
 
IYKWIM
 If You Know What I Mean
 
IYSS
 If You Say So
 
J/C
 Just Checking
 
J/K
 Just Kidding!
 
J/W
 Just Wondering
 
JAFO
 Just Another F***ing Onlooker
 
KFY
 Kiss For You
 
KISS
 Keep It Simple Stupid
 
KIT
 Keep In Touch
 
KMA
 Kiss My Ass
 
KWIM
 Know What I Mean
 
KYPO
 Keep Your Pants On
 
L8R
 Later
 
LD
 Long Distance
 
LDTTWA
 Let's Do The Time Warp Again
 
LLTA
 Lots And Lots Of Thunderous Applause
 
LMAO
 Laughing My Ass Off
 
LMK
 Let Me Know
 
LOL
 Laughing Out Loud -or- Lots of Luck (or Love)
 
LTIC
 Laughing 'Til I Cry
 
LTNS
 Long Time No See
 
LYL
 Love Ya Lots
 
LYLAS
 Love You Like A Sister
 
MHOTY
 My Hat's Off To You
 
MM
 Market Maker
 
MorF
 Male or Female?
 
MOTD
 Message Of The Day
 
MOTSS
 Members Of The Same Sex
 
MTFBWY
 May The Force Be With You
 
MWBRL
 More Will Be Revealed Later
 
MYOB
 Mind Your Own Business
 
NAK
 Nursing At Keyboard
 
NAZ
 Name, Address, Zip (also means Nasdaq)
 
NBD
 No Big Deal
 
NBIF
 No Basis In Fact
 
NFI
 No F***ing Idea
 
NFW
 No F***ing Way
 
NG
 New Game
 
NIFOC
 Nude In Front Of The Computer
 
NM
 Never Mind
 
NMP
 Not My Problem
 
NOYB
 None Of Your Business
 
NP
 No Problem
 
NQOCD
 Not Quite Our Class Dear
 
NRG
 Energy
 
NRN
 No Reply Necessary
 
NYCFS
 New York City Finger Saluet
 
OAUS
 On An Unrelated Subject
 
OBTW
 Oh By The Way
 
OIC
 Oh, I see
 
OMDB
 Over My Dead Body
 
OMG
 Oh My Gosh
 
OMIK
 Open Mouth, Insert Keyboard
 
ONNA
 Oh No, Not Again
 
OOC
 Out Of Character
 
OOTB
 Out Of The Box -or- Out Of The Blue
 
OT
 Off Topic
 
OTOH
 On the Other Hand
 
OWTTE
 Or Words To That Effect
 
OZ
 stands for "Australia"
 
PEBCAK
 Problem Exists Between Chair And Keyboard
 
PIMP
 Peeing In My Pants
 
PITA
 Pain In The Ass
 
PLS
 Please
 
PMFJI
 Pardon Me For Jumping In
 
PO
 Piss Off
 
POV
 Point of View
 
RBTL
 Read Between The Lines
 
RL
 Real Life
 
RLF
 Real Life Friend
 
RMLB
 Read My Lips Baby
 
RMMM
 Read My Mail Man!
 
RN
 Right Now!
 
ROTFL
 Rolling On The Floor Laughing
 
ROTFLMAO
 Rolling On The Floor Laughing My Ass Off
 
ROTM
 Right On The Money
 
RSN
 Real Soon Now
 
RTFM
 Read The F***ing Manual
 
RTK
 Return To Keyboard
 
RTM
 Read The Manual
 
RU
 Are You?
 
SBTA
 Sorry, Being Thick Again
 
SH
 Sh** Happens
 
SITD
 Still In The Dark
 
SNAFU
 Situation Normal, All F***ed Up
 
SOL
 Sh** Out of Luck
 
SorG
 Straight or Gay?
 
SSDD
 Same Sh** Different Day
 
STFU
 Shut The F*** Up
 
STM
 Spank The Monkey
 
STYS
 Speak To You Soon
 
SUYF
 Shut Up You Fool
 
SWAG
 Scientific Wild Ass Guess
 
SWAK
 Sent (or Sealed) With A Kiss
 
SWDYT
 So What Do You Think?
 
TAH
 Take A Hike
 
TANSTAAFL
 There Ain't No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
 
TARFU
 Things Are Really F***ed Up
 
TDTM
 Talk Dirty To Me
 
TEOTWAWKI
 The End Of The World As We Know It
 
TFN
 Thanks For Nothin'
 
THX or TX or THKS
 Thanks
 
TIA
 Thanks In Advance
 
TIAIL
 Think I Am In Love
 
TIC
 Tongue In Cheek
 
TLA
 Three Letter Acronym
 
TLGO
 The List Goes On
 
TM
 Trust Me
 
TMI
 Too Much Information
 
TMTOWTDI
 There's More Than One Way To Do It
 
TPTB
 The Powers That Be
 
TSR
 Totally Stuck in RAM
 
TTFN
 Ta Ta For Now
 
TTT
 That's The Ticket -or- To The Top
 
TTYL
 Talk To You Later
 
TWHAB
 This Won't Hurt A Bit
 
TY
 Thank You
 
TYVM
 Thank You Very Much
 
unPC
 unPolitically Correct
 
URYY4M
 You Are Too Wise For Me
 
VFM
 Value For Money
 
WAG
 Wild Ass Guess
 
WAI
 What An Idiot
 
WB
 Welcome Back
 
WCA
 Who Cares Anyway
 
WDYS
 What Did You Say?
 
WDYT
 What Do You Think?
 
WE
 Whatever
 
WEG
 Wicked Evil Grin
 
WG
 Wicked Grin
 
WGAFF
 Who Gives A Flying F***
 
WIIFM
 What's In It For Me?
 
WIT
 Wordsmith In Training
 
WITFITS
 What in the F*** is this Sh**
 
WOG
 Wise Old Guy
 
WRT
 With Regard To
 
WTF
 What The F***
 
WTG
 Way To Go!
 
WTSDS
 Where The Sun Don't Shine
 
WYP
 What's Your Problem?
 
WYRN
 What's Your Real Name?
 
WYS
 Whatever You Say
 
WYSIWYG
 What You See Is What You Get
 
WYT
 Whatever You Think
 
YA
 Yet Another
 
YA yaya
 Yet Another Ya-Ya (as in yo-yo)
 
YAFIYGI
 You Asked For It You Got It
 
YDKM
 You Don't Know Me
 
YGBK
 You Gotta Be Kiddin'
 
YMMV
 Your Mileage May Vary
 
YNK
 You Never Know
 
YOYO
 You're On Your Own
 
YR
 Yeah Right
 
YSYD
 Yeah, Sure You Do
 
YTTT
 You Telling The Truth?
 
YYSSW
 Yeah Yeah Sure Sure Whatever
 
Collaboration in social media expands new literacy as a social practice (Barton and Hamilton, 1998; Street, 1997). The form a text takes is influenced by the cultural context and its purpose (Halliday, 1985) and within the many possible virtual worlds meaning is shared. What we need to be mindful of is that it is not solely a Western interpretation or one set by the United States of America who is influencing the young with virtual communities.
Education now must be a collaborative environment. We have [[social sites]], the Internet, Skype, and the [[literature of other cultures]] available as [[Digital Literacy]] on DVDs, spreadable via cell phones and other mobile devices. The [[draft k-12 Australian Curriculum]] clearly states this,
>''Tamwork, self-management, and social competence are explicit in the English curriculum and are also inherent in man activites that form the basis of classroom practices in the teaching of English. 
!!There are many opportunities for students to work collaboratively, and manage personal learning...'
[[The Melbourne Declaration|http://www.adlaustralia.org/aatgc/index.html],Advancing ADL through Global Collaboration, furthers the efforts of the [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum]]
From [[Computer Writing|http://neuage.org/AA/computer_writing.htm]] at Albany Academy for Girls and Albany Academy for Boys - 2003-2005, Dr. [[Neuage]]
Course Description: This is an introductory course on experimental computer writing using hypertext, digital storytelling, Online WebPoetry as well as student's critiques of hypertextual literature already produced. We use the hypertext writing environment, Storyspace from [[Eastgate|http://www.eastgate.com/storyspace]].   

Our course, Computer Writing, looks at electronic narrative. Firstly, we will work with hypertextual writing. Hypertext is non-linear and multi-linear narrative that is linked according to the witness of the story.

In essence, the reader becomes the writer-narrator, following self-chosen links. Hypertext writing shares some interesting features with folk storytelling traditions, for example, Native American due to its digressive elements (stories within stories); what is called "a story" is really a Web of stories, and like oral telling, in hypertext, no two explorations of a hypertext narrative are exactly the same for readers. In hypertext the focus is on the reader and the appearance of choice and some determination of how to read, as every part of a hypertext narrative presents multiple choices for the direction and sequence of reading. 

We will be reading and critiquing five stories ([[Samplers|http://www.eastgate.com/catalog/Samplers.html]], Deena Larsen; [[Victory Garden|http://www.eastgate.com/catalog/VictoryGarden.html]], Stuart Moulthrop; [[We Descend|http://www.eastgate.com/catalog/WeDescend.html]], Bill Bly; [[Patchwork Girl|http://www.eastgate.com/catalog/PatchworkGirl.html]], Shelley Jackson; and [[Marble Springs|http://www.eastgate.com/catalog/MarbleSprings.html]], Deena Larsen) from Eastgate publishers (http://www.eastgate.com) then we will create our own hypertextual stories in the program [[‘Storyspace’|http://www.eastgate.com/storyspace/]].

Later in the course we will explore digital storytelling which is the use of images and animations to tell a narrative
[[Neuage]]
!Current research:
#GRIN technologies': [Genetics, Robotics, Artificial Intelligence, and Nanotechnology] impact on communicational evolutions; how will we translate meaning from sender to receiver if the ‘decoder’ is inserted in the minds of but a fraction of society? An extension to my [[PhD]] thesis: ‘Conversational Analysis of Chatroom “talk”’
# Philosophical clashes between longevity (the race to extend life cycles without end) ~ reincarnation and traditional Christianity.
# Notes on [[Secondlife|http://secondlife.neuage.us/]] project [Division or Synchronization can the person still exist when there is no physical counterpoint?]
Type the text for 'New Tiddler'
Notes, Tiddlers, quotes regarding the draft K–10 Australian Curriculum are from the version 1.0.1 downloaded from the [[ACARA Australian Curriculum Consultation Portal|http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home]] 21/04/2010.
Notes, Tiddlers, quotes regarding the draft K–10 Australian Curriculum are from the version 1.0.1 downloaded from the [[ACARA Australian Curriculum Consultation Portal|http://www.australiancurriculum.edu.au/Home]] 21/04/2010.
CHATROOM EMOTICONS/[[ASSICONS]] and acronyms or [[abbreviations]] and/or also Known as Chat Acronyms and E-mail Shorthand, these "[[abbreviations]]" are also used in Newsgroup Postings and IRC. A smiley is a sequence of characters on your computer keyboard. If you don't see it, try tilting your head to the left -- the colon represents the eyes, the dash represents the nose and the right parenthesis represents the mouth. Smileys usually follow after the punctuation (or in place of the punctuation) at the end of a sentence. A smiley [ :) = J : (= L ] tells someone what you really mean when you make an offhand remark. They are also called emoticons because they intend to convey emotion!
[[more on emoticons|http://neuage.org/se/phd/storm/abreviations.htm]] some examples below, collected by Neuage 1998 - 2002, PhD:

@>--;--
 A rose
 
O:-)
 Angel
 
0*-)
 Angel winking
 
d:-)
 Baseball
 
:-)
 Basic
 
:)
 Basic Little Kid
 
:~-(
 Bawling
 
: =
 Beaver
 
:-)^<
 Big Boy 
 
(:-)
 Big Face
 
:-)8<
 Big Girl
 
(((H)))
 Big Hug
 
:-X
 Big Wet Kiss
 
=|:o}
 Bill Clinton smiley
 
(:-D
 Blabber Mouth
 
?-(
 Black Eye
 
:-]
 Blockhead
 
:-}X
 Bow Tie-Wearing
 
%-6
 Brain Dead
 
:-(=)
 Bucktoothed
 
:-E
 Bucktoothed Vampire
 
:-F
 Bucktoothed Vampire with One Tooth Missing
 
}|{
 Butterfly 
 
})i({
 Butterfly - an even prettier one
 
}:-X
 Cat
 
q:-)
 Catcher
 
C=:-)
 Chef
 
8^
 Chicken
 
;-(
 Chin up
 
:-.)
 Cindy Crawford
 
*<):o)
 Clown
 
:-S
 Confused
 
H-)
 Cross-Eyed
 
:`-(
 Crying 
 
:*(
 Crying softly
 
:-@!
 Cursing
 
O-)
 Cyclops
 
>:->
 Devilish
 
:-e
 Disappointed
 
:3-]
 Dog
 
:*)
 Drinking every night
 
:#)
 Drunk
 
.\/
 Duck
 
<:-l
 Dunce
 
:-6
 Eating Something Spicy
 
5:-)
 Elvis
 
:")
 Embarrased
 
>:)
 Evil
 
>-)
 Evil Grin
 
l:-O
 FlatTop Loudmouth
 
:-!
 Foot in Mouth
 
=:-H
 Football player
 
:-W
 Forked Tongue
 
:^{=
 Frank Zappa 
 
/:-)
 Frenchman with a beret
 
8)
 Frog
 
%-)
 Happy Drunk
 
l^o
 Hepcat
 
(_8^(|)
 Homer Simpson
 
(_8(|)
 Homer Simpson
 
*^_^*
 Huge Dazzling Grin
 
%*@:-(
 Hungover with headache
 
?:^[]
 Jim Carrey
 
(8 {
 John Lennon 
 
@:-}
 Just Back From Hairdresser
 
:-x
 Kid smiley
 
:-*
 Kiss
 
>^,,^<
 Kitty Cat
 
>:-l
 Klingon
 
@(*0*)@
 Koala Bear
 
(-:
 Left Hand
 
Þ-:
 Left Handed Tongue Touching Nose
 
>;->
 Lewd Remark
 
8:-)
 Little Girl
 
|-(
 Lost Contact Lenses
 
X-(
 Mad
 
&-l
 Makes Me Cry
 
:-(*)
 Makes Me Sick
 
:-S
 Makes No Sense
 
@@@@:-)
 Marge Simpson
 
8(:-)
 Mickey Mouse
 
:)
 Midget
 
:-{
 Mustache
 
:-3
 Mustache (Handlebar Type)
 
:-#
 My Lips Are Sealed
 
):-(
 Nordic
 
8-O
 Omigod!
 
:=)
 Orangutan
 
:^)
 Personality
 
3:]
 Pet Dog
 
:8)

  
=:-)
 Punk
 
=:-(
 Punk Not Smiling
 
:-r
 Rasberry
 
(((((:-{=
 Rave Dude
 
:-C
 Real Unhappy
 
([(
 Robocop
 
[:]
 Robot
 
3:*>
 Rudolph the red nose reindeer
 
:(
 Sad Turtle
 
:-d
 Said with a smile
 
*<|:-)
 Santa Claus
 
:->
 Sarcastic
 
:-@
 Screaming
 
$$
 Sees Money
 
+-(
 Shot Between the Eyes
 
:-V
 Shouting
 
~:-P
 Single Hair
 
:-/
 Skeptical
 
O-)
 Smiley After Smoking a Banana
 
;^)
 Smirking
 
:-i 
 Smoking a cig
 
:-?
 Smoking a pipe
 
:-Q
 Smoking while talking
 
:-( <|
 Standing Firm 
 
%-)
 Staring at a Screen for 15 hours 
 
:-0
 Talkative
 
:-Þ 
 Tongue Sticking Out
 
:-&
 Tongue Tied 
 
:-a
 Tongue Touching Nose
 
<:>==
 Turkey
 
=):-)
 Uncle Sam
 
:-\
 Undecided 
 
|:-)
 Unibrow
 
:-[
 Vampire
 
(:-(
 Very Unhappy
 
:-<
 Walrus
 
[:-)
 Wearing a Walkman
 
8-)
 Wearing Contacts
 
B-)
 Wearing Glasses
 
:-{}
 Wearing Lipstick
 
]-I
 Wearing Sunglasses
 
{:-)
 Wears a Toupee
 
:-"
 Whistling
 
'-)
 Winking
 
,-)
 Winking Happy
 
8<:-)
 Wizard
 
-=#:-) \
 Wizard with Wand
 
,-}
 Wry and Winking
 
l-O
 Yawning
 
:-(0)
 Yelling
 
=8-0
 Yikes!
 
$-)
 Yuppie
 
!PLEASE DO NOT COUNT TOWARD ASSIGNMENT 2 NOTES ONLY
>([[Neuage]] [[PhD]] [[ODAM]] and [[Current Research]] 1994 - 2010 
The study of language is one of the oldest branches of systematic inquiry, tracing back to classical India and Greece, (see note 1 below) with a rich and fruitful history of achievement (Chomsky, 2001). The basic building blocks of communication have changed little, but the methods through which we are able to use our linguistic abilities to convey ideas have changed drastically.&nbsp; From the era of pictograph accounts written on clay tablets in Sumeria 5500 years ago, to the first evidence of writing during the Protoliterate period (see note 2 below) (Sumerian civilization, to about 28 B.C.) it can be seen that forms of communication advanced and changed radically. For example, by 2800 B.C. the use of syllabic writing (see note 3 below) had reduced the number of signs from nearly two thousand to six hundred ([see note 4 below]). Currently the English language uses 26 letters.&nbsp; Curiously, in the electronic era, with the use of emoticons in online communication, there are once again hundreds of signs with which to communicate.
# There are many texts on how language evolved.&nbsp; (See “The rise and fall of languages”, by Dixon, 1977).&nbsp; He traces the theoretical issues of language from a comparative and historical linguistics view.&nbsp; For example, Dixon traces language prototypes over the 100,000 years humans are believed to have used language to communicate. What is interesting from the perspective of my [[PhD]] study was  how languages currently spoken and understood are changing with the globalisation of communication. The more people “chat” on the Internet from different cultures, the more homogenised language may become.&nbsp; I looked at this issue in several case studies where I  compared chatrooms from different languages to discover whether the same [[abbreviations]] and [[emoticons]] were used or whether different languages used their own [[abbreviation]]s.&nbsp; For example, I investigated whether abbreviations such as, BW, “by-the-way”, which is one of the more commonly used [[abbreviation]]s in Internet chat, as well as in SMS messages on mobile and palm-computers, is the same in other languages.&nbsp; 
# See http://home.swipnet.se/~w-63448/mespro.htm. Viewed 21/3/2010
# See&nbsp; http://www.halfmoon.org/writing.html&nbsp; viewed 21/11/2001
# “Rise Of The Human Race, The Civilizations Of The Ancient Near East”http://www.emayzine.com/lectures/sumeria.htm viewed 21/11/2001
# Everything that we do as a consumer leaves an electronic footprint whether it is shopping or using electronic equipment. Whatever we do on a computer (and/or network, Internet, e-mail, instant messages) leaves an electronic footprint.
[# For a history of The Internet from its source see 
http://public.web.cern.ch/Public/ACHIEVEMENTS/web.html&nbsp;
!!discussion on hyperlink is not part of the word count for assignment two - just ramblings of a linking mind.

In [[Nicholas Carr's article|http://www.theatlantic.com/nicholas-carr/]], //'Is Google Making Us Stupid? What the Internet is doing to our brains'// in the [[July/August 2008|http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/toc/2008/07]] issue of the [[ATLANTIC MAGAZINE|http://www.theatlantic.com]] he says,
>//'It is clear that users are not reading online in the traditional sense; indeed there are signs that new forms of “reading” are emerging as users “power browse” horizontally through titles, contents pages and abstracts going for quick wins. It almost seems that they go online to avoid reading in the traditional sense. '//

It is this sense of multi-connectedness where the “flattened” screening of postings renders the selection of response patterns difficult, and so directs the learner towards the multi-threading structure of [[hypertext]]. How then does social relationality – that “politic of power” discovered within such Conversational Analysis (CA) categories as turn-taking – work in online negotiations such as chating in a blog, twitter or any [[social site]]? How is language oriented towards both self-assertion within a group, and the different behaviours and speech selections which act to structured speech relations? 

Discourse structures refer to the specific levels of skill in reading and writing which involve the analytical capacity to determine and select in response the “correct” phonology, morphology and syntax for use in a certain communicative context. 

The Internet provides the link for an electronic interactive conversation – and so its hypertextual format has an immediate impact.&nbsp; Electronic digital technologies lack a sense of linearity; in fact, they are based on a nonlinear structure that tends to facilitate a more associative way of organizing information, through the hypertext principle (Landow, 1994 and 1997; Bolter, 1991). While print media work as a flow of conversation or writing directed in an organized progression, online conversations fragment multi-directionally.&nbsp; Conversation on the World Wide Web, whether in chatroom, instant messenger (IM), discussion groups, twitters or even in role-playing games such as MUDs, MOOS,  [[Second Life|http://secondlife.neuage.us/]] or any of the [[social sites]] children play in, involves two new paradigm shifts. Firstly, there is the shift from print to computerization.&nbsp; Print relies on hierarchy and linearity (see: Comte, 2002; Landow, 1994; Chandler, 1999).&nbsp; Critical theorists point out that traditional print is linear, while human thought is not (Edwards, 1985; McElhearn, 2000). With computers and hypertext we can leap from thought to thought without a sequencing event.

Computer interactivity however can be either asynchronous or synchronous. Instant Messenger, ICQ, and PalTalk have only two voices at one time, but not necessarily following one another. In text-chat only one line shows at a time, unlike the overlaps in voice-chat or in real-life chat. People still “talk” at the same time.&nbsp; One does not always wait for a response. If two people are typing rapidly back and forth, they can return and respond to something which was said while the other was typing. But their typed lines appear as if in dialogue. The software mimics a conversational relation, at least in its reciprocal relation on the screen. Therefore IM and its variants are a synchronous CMC format.

Nicholas Carr's blog on  [[What the Internet is doing to our brains|http://dialogic.blogspot.com/2008/06/nicholas-carr-what-internet-is-doing-to.html]] highlights one of the drawbacks in reading on the Internet, 
>//'The idea that our minds should operate as high-speed data-processing machines is not only built into the workings of the Internet, it is the network’s reigning business model as well. The faster we surf across the Web—the more links we click and pages we view—the more opportunities Google and other companies gain to collect information about us and to feed us advertisements. Most of the proprietors of the commercial Internet have a financial stake in collecting the crumbs of data we leave behind as we flit from link to link—the more crumbs, the better. The last thing these companies want is to encourage leisurely reading or slow, concentrated thought. It’s in their economic interest to drive us to distraction.'//
A [[list of terms used in hypertext litterature|http://www.w3.org/Terms.html]]
Hypertext is text which contains links to other texts. The term was coined by [[Ted Nelson]] around 1965 (see History ). 
See the tiddler on [[What is writing? Computer vs. Hands]].

It is this sense of multi-connectedness where the “flattened” screening of postings renders the selection of response patterns difficult, and so directs the learner towards the multi-threading structure of [[hypertext]]. How then does social relationality – that “politic of power” discovered within such Conversational Analysis (CA) categories as turn-taking – work in online negotiations such as chating in a blog, twitter or any of hundreds of  [[social sites]]? How is language oriented towards both self-assertion within a group, and the different behaviours and speech selections which act to structured speech relations?
Type the text for 'language'
The [[draft K–10 Australian Curriculum]], p.5, lists intercultural understanding as one of the identified ten general capabilities that will be specifically covered in the curriculum. Coupling this with //Teamwork, self-management, and social competence// there are many opportunities for students to work collaboratively. Many [[social sites]] that students use outside of school bring them into other cultures and for many these [[transnational identities]] enhance the learning process. It should be the position of teachers to identify which of the many trends students are using at home could be introduced in the educational system. There should not be a big gap between what students do in school and what they do outside.
New York City has one of its mission goals to assist all students in being at a standard by the end of each grade. This is highlighted in the [[Great Expectations Learning Guides|http://schools.nyc.gov/Academics/Great+Expectations.htm]]

The guides are available in nine languages (English, Spanish, Chinese, Russian, Arabic, Urdu, Bengali, Korean and Haitian Creole).

[[New York City Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) programs|http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/90EC9B10-88FF-4A06-98BC-23CC495032C9/83634/TBESPRING2010_FINAL.pdf]] are offered in many schools throughout The City.
The effect of the World Wide Web on literature

[[The effect of literature on the World Wide Web|Masters thesis: Influence of the World Wide Web on literature]]
@@LITwebERATURE@@ may be defined as literature which is developed and formed in webs as it is found on the World Wide Web; with multiple links, levels and dimensions and without centre, beginning or end. 
<html><a href="http://www.neuage.org/picture_poems/queen.gif    "><img src="http://neuage.info/se/phd/litweberature_files/image001.gif     "style="height: 450px;"  /></a></html>
Masters Deakin University Melbourne Australia 1995
word and definition copyright terrell neuage hackham south australia july 14 1995
[[LURKING|http://neuage.info/se/phd/lurking.htm]]
Recent research is challenging some of the benefits of [[hypertext]]. Studies show the increase brainwave activity forming new nodes. However, there is a lose in focus of what is being read/learned. With hyperlinks there is the value of enhanced information yet at the same time their is a muddlnessness in too much linkage. 

'//The core of education is this: developing the capacity to concentrate. The fruits of this capacity we call civilization. But all that is finished, perhaps,//' according to researcher Nicholas Carr.
 '//Welcome to the shallows, where the un-educating of homo sapiens begins//'...  '//What emerges for the reader, inexorably, is the suspicion that we have well and truly screwed ourselves.//' (Matthew B. Crawford).

In Carr's new book, //The Shallows: What the Internet Is Doing to Our Brains// he argues that all that we do on the Internet shatters our focus and rewires our brain. In the June, 2010 //Wired// magazine, article, //CHAOS THEORY// the effects of [[hypertext]] can make us lose focus. The story may never become read. '

'//The Internet is an interruption system. It seizes our attention only to scramble it//', pp112 – 118 [[multimodal]] and [[multimodal texts]] with a lot of [[hyperlink]]s in the [[hypertext]] can make the learner lose focus when the original [[multifocal]] intent was to enhance. I have seen this repeatedly in the classroom, students become so muddled they have no idea what they are reading. The young learner does not have the cognitive discipline to stay on track. 
Life is multimodal. Literacy is multimodal with interjections of chatroom utterances ([[Neuage]] [[PhD]] thesis, 2005), [[picture poems|http://neuage.org/windows_open.htm]], [[youtube|http://www.youtube.com/tneuage]] videos as well as virtual lives such as in [[Second Life|http://secondlife.com]].

With an integration of the immense modes of communications we have the capability to transform meaning into a singular meaning using mashups of other people's creative efforts. We see this with youtube and webpages, blogs, wikis (though not with tiddlywikis because they  exist locally and have few mashup properties outside of coping and pasting someone's text).  There are “Multiple ways of knowing” (Short & Harste, 1996) which include art, music, movement, and drama and as my example above, using programs such as Flash to make a story.  
Every communication mode is codependent and each affects how the content is perceived. 

See [[Multimodal Literacies and Technology|http://www.ncte.org/governance/MultimodalLiteracies]]
In the [[draft k-12 Australian Curriculum]], page two (re. multimodal texts) the interrelated areas of language, literacy and literature form the core of the English curriculum which is the foundation of studying across all curriculum areas.  See [[multimodal]], [[hyperlink]], [[hypertext]] and [[Digital Literacy]] for the impact of multimodal texts.
MyRead http://www.myread.org website [[Activity 2.3]] 
It took several days of reading many blogs and watching videos to understand how this works. Furthermore it crashes quite frequently. It performs so poorly in Open Source - such as Ubuntu - that it put a bug in my operating system and I had to do a clean re-install which wiped out months of work and a lot of files. Luckily, I had a lot backed up but it was still another weekend lost. This is about a ten-week course with a lot of reading, almost full-time school visits and I have to live my life, i.e. make a living, hang out with the wife - dodge terrorists in NYC and pretend I am happy. 

If someone had said in the beginning that a tiddly winky thingy is really similar to html with frames I would have understood it. I started with frames in my webpage coding in 1993. You put the word in the left column or frame and it links to the main frame. So easy to understand but no one has said this.
>I did create a pattern to follow a semi-linear format as below, if logical has any importance. Otherwise skip around:

![[Introduction]]
>[[Furthermore]]
![[Towards an Australian National Curriculum]]
![[What is literacy]]
![[Digital Literacy]]
![[Digital vs. Linear]]
![[Educational Technology]]
![[What is writing? Computer vs. Hands]]
![[Reading: Book vs. iPads]]
![[Will it work?]]
![[References]]
For example, these [[social sites]] say they are for 8 – 12s but I have seen five and six year old children who have played or/and been a part of these. Try one of these in your classrooms:

* [[Imbee|http://www.imbee.com/]] PR 6 Social Networking designed for kids 8-12 (from their site  "Welcome to imbee a safer social networking site that allows the young, hip and trendy to share and connect with friends, their lives and their world through a “one-of-a-kind” social media experience. Share playlists, make new global friends, chat with friends, share your videos, get your daily scope, connect with celebs, and much more.") Good site to integrate into lower school.
*  [[Active Worlds PR 6 3D virtual world chat|http://www.activeworlds.com/edu/index.asp]] ("The  *[[AWEDU|http://www.activeworlds.com/edu/awedu.asp]] is a unique educational community that makes the Active Worlds technology available to educational institutions, teachers, students, and individual programs in a focused setting. Via this community, educators are able to explore new concepts, learning theories, creative curriculum design, and discover new paradigms in social learning. ")
* [[Boom Bang|http://www.boombang.tv/eng/]] PR 4 Chat, make friends and explore a virtual world. Kindy kids can play this and learn basics of social interaction.
* [[Dofus|http://www.dofus.com/en]] PR 6 Mulit player online role playing game. This is rated +12 - though 6th graders play it. It has received many international gaming awards. See Wikipedia [[for this|http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dofus]]. 
* [[Sanriotown|http://us.sanriotown.com/]] PR 6 Hello Kitty games, community, blogs and forums Great for five and above.
* [[Webkinz|http://www.webkinz.com/us_en/]] PR 6 Virtual pet community for plush pets. Primary students love this.
* [[Club Penguin|http://www.clubpenguin.com/]] PR 6 Virtual world for kids. I have used this in first grade. A good social learning tool.
* [[Marapets|http://www.marapets.com/]] PR 3 Virtual pet site with games and chat community. Another virtual pet and chat place.
*[[Neopets|http://www.neopets.com/]] PR 6 Virtual world for pets - yes another virtual pet community. I suppose if one lives in NYC this is better than carrying a bag and scooping up dog poo.
* [[Endless Online|http://www.endless-online.com/]] PR 4 Community role playing games. The title says it all - very popular with middle school and above.
* [[Furcadia||http://www.furcadia.com/]] PR 5 Community role playing game. Furcadia is claimed as the longest continuously running MMO. Another one for younger students.
* [[Hero Online|http://hero.netgame.com/]] PR 4 Community warfare games. Great for high school - get those kids ready to kill so we can send them off to the next war for oil.
*[[Millsberry|http://www.millsberry.com/]] PR 4 Home building community. "Playing games featuring breakfast cereals like Lucky Charms, Peanut Butter Toast Crunch and Reese's Puffs". Far out - and we wonder why the kids are so fat.

And there is my favorite (favourite) – 'Farmville' (in Facebook)  that not only do six and ten year old folks have farms to tend but those of us in our 60s and I know older have farms to tend to. 
I was setting up Second Life in a school I taught at a few years ago with kids who were ten. This is the new interactive literature. I am doing prac teaching in 6th grade now and we are using MIT's Scratch to create interactive stories. Last year in grade two and three we used Comic Life to create stories and they were really good at it. We made digital poems and uploaded them to youtube in grade two. It is being done now – we are role playing and creating stories with students in other countries and other cultures. The future of literacy is exciting. If it were not for the dozen hour difference in time between you all down there and us in NYC I would have my grade four that I am prac teaching with do a collaborative live project together in real time. 
Like other areas of the Internet, chatrooms rapidly established regulatory sets of etiquette, and rules of cybersense are continuously evolving. Netiquette customs and practices began in the late 1980s with the widening use of e-mail and have been adopted in order to promote effective electronic communication[16]. Netiquette has different rules for different online formats. The most generally accepted Netiquette behaviours are based on having respect for others in the online community. For example, using ALL CAPITAL LETTERS is considered shouting and is hard on the eyes; “Flaming” or attacking others in the online community or inciting or provoking an argument are considered unacceptable to other users and often evoke banishment from sites by site supervisors, and “Spamming” - posting something in many places at the same time – is both actively discouraged and open to technical blocking via protective software. 

[[Conversational analysis of chatroom talk|http://neuage.org/thesis.htm]] Terrell Neuage, [[PhD]], University of South Australia
Key Ideas from the [[New York State Technology Standards]]
[[Standard 1|http://eservices.nysed.gov/vls/keyIdeaSelection.do?title=KeyIdea Selection&standardAreaID=6&levelID=27&contentID=29&subjectAreaID=13]] and how I will teach it in [[Elementary and Intermediate Grade Levels]]
!!Mathematical Analysis   
1. Abstraction and symbolic representation are used to communicate mathematically. 
2. Deductive and inductive reasoning are used to reach mathematical conclusions.  
3. Critical thinking skills are used in the solution of mathematical problems.  
!!!Students: extend mathematical notation and symbolism to include variables and algebraic expressions in order to describe and compare quantities and express mathematical relationships.  
!!Scientific Inquiry 
1. The central purpose of scientific inquiry is to develop explanations of natural phenomena in a continuing, creative process.  
2. Beyond the use of reasoning and consensus, scientific inquiry involves the testing of proposed explanations involving the use of conventional techniques and procedures and usually requiring considerable ingenuity.  
3. The observations made while testing proposed explanations, when analyzed using conventional and invented methods, provide new insights into phenomena.  
!!Engineering Design 
1. Engineering design is an iterative process involving modeling and optimization finding the best solution within given constraints which is used to develop technological solutions to problems within given constraints.  

   
    
 

 
>I will be using standard 2 to answer [[Question 3]]  'How are you going to teach to them? To go at length for each standard will take me beyond my word count and I will get an even poorer grade than I will get for all this incredible amount of work I have produced. Considering there are no teaching jobs out there why am I doing this? Last week there were 3500 applications for seven teaching jobs at a school in NYC. Why bother?
Key Ideas from the [[New York State Technology Standards]]
[[Information Systems|http://eservices.nysed.gov/vls/keyIdeaSelection.do?title=KeyIdea Selection&standardAreaID=6&levelID=27&contentID=37&subjectAreaID=13]]
1. Information technology is used to retrieve, process, and communicate information and as a tool to enhance learning.  
!!Performance Indicators:
A. use a range of equipment and software to integrate several forms of information in order to create good quality audio, video, graphic, and text-based presentations.  
>What I use and will use for this performance indicator are, in a Mac school: the iLife suite to create literary works that eventually become youtube videos (using iTunes, iMovie, iPhoto, Photoshop, Word and a  webcam alone with knowledge of html for webpage creation). Last year I did this with second and third grade classes and we used Comic Life to storyboard before dubbing it with iTunes. Two years ago I did  a poetry project with sixth grade http://www.youtube.com/TheDwightSchool Five years ago I used these performance indicators with students in 9 – 12 using the 3D animation creation [[Rhino 3D|http://www.rhino3d.com/]]. I have used [[Second LIfe|http://secondlife.neuage.us/]], [[Google Sketchup|http://sketchup.google.com/]] and Hypertextual story designed scripting using [[Eastgate|http://www.eastgate.com/]] widely considered the tool of choice for hypertext writers. I also collaborated with the Music Department and the Arts Department at [[Albany Academy for Girls|http://neuage.org/AA/index.htm]] using Ulead video, Vegas video, Sony Acid Studio and Final Cut to create year-long projects.
Currently for my practicum I am using Windows Movie Video with the fourth grade as we make a news show for a collaborative project for unit 410. And in sixth grade I am using MIT's Scratch (see [[High School Mathematics Courses Based on the Common Core Standards]]). 

B. use spreadsheets and data-base software to collect, process, display, and analyze information. Students access needed information from electronic data bases and on-line telecommunication services.  
I have done this K – 12 as well as at the State University of New York over the past seven years. I am currently using Excel and Google Docs in 6th grade. Last year, using iChat I did a collaborative project between three schools with Second and Third grade music and in the 8th grade my students did a hip-hop workshop for another school – live, on iChat.

C. systematically obtain accurate and relevant information pertaining to a particular topic from a range of sources, including local and national media, libraries, museums, governmental agencies, industries, and individuals.  
For the past several years I have been using the New York City online library and databases with students for research.

D. collect data from probes to measure events and phenomena. 
I have not done this before but I can see working with the science department using Google Spreadsheets and Skype to collaborate on findings.
The following performance indicators are built into a year's work as computer teacher and technology integrator.
2. Knowledge of the impacts and limitations of information systems is essential to its effective and ethical use.
!!Performance Indicators:
A. understand the need to question the accuracy of information displayed on a computer because the results produced by a computer may be affected by incorrect data entry.  
B. identify advantages and limitations of data-handling programs and graphics programs.  
C. understand why electronically stored personal information has greater potential for misuse than records kept in conventional form.  
3. Information technology can have positive and negative impacts on society, depending upon how it is used.  
!!Performance Indicators:
A. use graphical, statistical, and presentation software to presents project to fellow classmates.  
B. describe applications of information technology in mathematics, science, and other technologies that address needs and solve problems in the community.  
C. explain the impact of the use and abuse of electronically generated information on individuals and families.  
 
 
   
    
 
Key Ideas from the [[New York State Technology Standards]]
[[Engineering Design|http://eservices.nysed.gov/vls/keyIdeaSelection.do?title=KeyIdea Selection&standardAreaID=6&levelID=27&contentID=52&subjectAreaID=13]] 
 
Key Ideas from the [[New York State Technology Standards]]
[[Interconnectedness – Common Themes|http://eservices.nysed.gov/vls/keyIdeaSelection.do?title=KeyIdea Selection&standardAreaID=6&levelID=27&contentID=53&subjectAreaID=13]]
Key Ideas from the [[New York State Technology Standards]]
[[Interdisciplinary Problem Solving|http://eservices.nysed.gov/vls/keyIdeaSelection.do?title=KeyIdea Selection&standardAreaID=6&levelID=27&contentID=54&subjectAreaID=13]]
! comments on literacy origins - please do not use for word count
We cannot know what the world was like before human language existed.  For tens of thousands of years, language has developed to form modern systems of grammar and syntax, yet   language origin theories by necessity remain based largely on speculation. In the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries there were several proposals with labels which tended to signal the desperation of their authors: “ding-dong”, “bow-wow” and “yo-he-ho” theories (Barber, 1972), each attempting to explain in general social terms the origin of language. While such conjecture must always remain unresolved, the rapid changes in communicative technologies in the late twentieth century, together with their markedly social or participatory bias, allows us to glimpse once again the intriguing degree to which ordinary people are willing to push the limits of communicative systems. With chatrooms, language itself may be going through new and rapid development – or, on the other hand, enthusiasts may be taking advantage of a brief experimental moment, acquiring expertise in communicative techniques which prove to be short-lived.  This period of intense activity is however one among many steps in the long process of human communication. Certainly, chatroom communication (and its more recent take-up in mobile telephony’s SMSing) very obviously separates from traditional language through regulated processes of word corruption and its compensatory use of abbreviations and emoticons. (I explore emoticons in Case Study Three and abbreviations and other language parts in Case Study Seven). But how did these new forms emerge? What produced them? What does it mean that such innovation can arise in such a short time span? And are these limited, or generalisable, features of modern language use? These questions can only be answered definitively in the future, but they can be discussed and elements of the new practices and behaviours described now, as they are in this thesis.

It is thought that the first humans may have exchanged information through both aural articulation and gesture: crude grunts and hand signals.  Gradually a complex system of spoken words and visual symbols was invented to represent what we would recognise as language. Earliest forms of telecommunication consisted of smoke signals, ringing a bell or physically transporting a memorised or texted message between two places. However, during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, communication codes for meaning were exchanged at a greater distance across time and became accessible to more users. A standard postal system allowed people to send messages throughout the world in a matter of days. The development of the telegraph cable, including the development of radio, made real-time vocal communication over long distances a reality. The Internet is the most recent such advance in communication.  It allows us, in a split second, to disseminate a seemingly limitless amount of information across the globe. 

All communication however – from the earliest conjectured formations to the multi-media flows of today - involves interaction, and thus forms a basis for social relationships: webs of cooperation and competition, expressiveness and message-conveying, play and work – social functions which treat even the human body as a tool for activity.  Language itself, evolving as a secondary use of physiological apparatus with otherwise directed purposes – the tongue, teeth, lips, breath, nose, larynx – constructs a self willing to sacrifice time, effort and attention to others, by re-forming that self into a communicating being.

All consequent communicative developments have at one level simply elaborated on this drive to “re-tool”, both within and beyond the body, as communities made more and more demands on socially regulated action. “Throughout the history of human communication, advances in technology have powered paradigmatic shifts…” (Frick, 1991). Technology changes how we communicate; big shifts in culture cannot occur until the communicative tools are available.  The printing press is an example of this.  Before its invention, scribal monks, sanctioned by the Church, had overseen the maintenance and hand copying of sacred texts for centuries (Spender, 1980, 1995).  The press resulted in widespread literacy, with books accessible and more affordable for all. The spread of literacy in turn changed communication, which changed the educational system and – to some degree at least - the class and authority structure. Literacy became a demand tool: a passport to the regulatory systems of the industrial-bureaucratic state emerging in the modern era. 
[[Neuage]] 2005 [[PhD]]
A recent study has shown that participants engaged in multiple literacy practices and who had forged transnational identities through online activities in [[social sites]] and forms of texting and virtual worlds involving 
>"creating and constructing a transnational and transcultural community" such as Facebook and "communicating via instant messaging." 
suggest that we should re-conceptualize the teaching and learning of students who share multilingual, transnational lived experiences and that we should re-examine what it means to be good, educated students and global citizens in the 21st century. (Youngjoo, 2009). Within this [[literature of other cultures]] students are as Thomas Friedman's book [[The World Is Flat|http://www.thomaslfriedman.com/bookshelf/the-world-is-flat]] proclaims, one with globalization.

In the Preamble to [[The Melbourne Declaration]] this integration is clearly stated,
>//'Global integration and international mobility have increased rapidly in te past decade. As a consequence,
new and exciting opportunities for Australians are emerging. This heightens the need to nurture an appreciation of and respect for social, cultural and religious diversity, and a sense of global citizenship.'//
@@Globalisation definition@@ From //[[Globalisation and culture|http://neuage.org/gc.htm]]// 'Globalisation and Culture ACOM 465' Terrell Neuage August 2003, Department of Communication, State University of New York, Albany.

An email from Manila...,
Date: Sun, 11 Aug 2002 21:08:49 -0700 (PDT) 
From: yas sutaria 
>Question: How to define globalization? 
>Answer: Princess Diana's death 
>Question: How come? 
>Answer: An English princess with an Egyptian boyfriend crashes in a French tunnel, driving a German car with a Dutch engine, driven by a Belgian who was pissed on Scottish whiskey, followed closely by an Italian Paparazzi, on motorcycles, treated by an American doctor, using Brazilian medicines! And this is sent to you by a Filipino, using an American's (Bill Gates') technology which he stole from the Taiwanese.

New York City public education provides bilingual programs (Transitional Bilingual Education and Dual Language) that strengthen students’ native language development and content knowledge while they build their social and academic English skills. Students with Englishis a second language make good use of English speaking [[social sites]] to enhance their learning.